Are De Novos Making A Comeback?

July 3rd, 2018

de-novo-7-3-18.pngThere was a time, not long ago, when FDIC approved 237 applications in a single year. That was 2005. It’s unlikely there will be a return to similar activity levels, the de novo activity has grown from the post-recession single-digit levels to more than 20 open applications. That number that is anticipated to increase through 2018.

Among the de novos are geographically diverse groups involving non-traditional business models, online services, foreign nationals, ethnic/professional niches and minority ownership. Regulators have been open to applications that may have been deemed “non-starters” years ago.

Changes have been made to the FDIC application process that will benefit new community banks such as lessening the de novo period from seven to three years. The rescinding of the FDIC de novo period, the designation of de novo subject matter experts in the regional offices, and the issuance of supplemental guidance along with the FDIC’s “A Handbook for Organizer of De Novo Institutions” indicate a growing commitment by regulators to facilitate the process of establishing new community banks.

To ensure a smooth regulatory process and avoid significant cost outlays, groups should schedule and attend meetings with various regulatory agencies before pre-filing meetings to discuss the timeline and the likelihood of acceptance of an application. Federal and state regulators act in a timely manner, provide constructive feedback and can be easy to work with throughout the de novo process. Strong working relationship with the federal and state regulators, along with the collaboration between all parties highlight the importance of building the right team at the start.

The minimum opening capital requirement has been established at around $22 million. The caveat is that the capital must be in line with the risk profile of proposed bank, though more often than not $20 million or more of seed capital is almost always needed. Why is $22 million or more the magic number?

  • Start-up costs and initial operating losses of $1.5 to $3 million;
  • Profitability being achieved at between $175 to $225 million in assets;
  • Required Tier One Leverage ratio above 8 percent or more throughout the de novo period;
  • Creates an adequate loan-to-borrower limit.

Once the formation bank reaches the minimum capital requirement and gains approval it can open the doors. Once open, the bank can continue raising capital until a higher or maximum level is reached. Additionally, the ability to use 401k accounts for investors is a necessity.

De novo formations bring value to their communities, their markets, shareholders, and the banking industry by filling a void created by the consolidation. With the loss of many key banks, organizers and local businesses feel that larger banks are not providing the level of service and credit desired by small- to medium-sized business owners.

Since the Great Recession, select areas of the country have rebounded more strongly than others. Texas, the Dakotas, Florida, the Carolinas, Washington, D.C., Utah and Washington state are among leaders in job creation and population growth. Given the growth, along with the opportunities to serve growing ethnic and minority populations, many geographies across the country offer attractive opportunities for de novo banking.

Returns for de novo investors can be attractive. There is a risk associated with the initial start-up expenses and a resulting decline in tangible book value. A de novo raises initial capital at tangible book value. While building a franchise, reaching profitability and creating a successful bank allows for multiple expansions and strategic options which can provide attractive returns for initial investors.

Creating a well-connected and qualified board, management team and investor group is proven to be the best recipe for success. Having these individuals and businesses as deposit and lending customers increase, the community’s confidence in the bank facilitates the business generation, along with the marketing and word of mouth publicity.

The proper de novo team is comprised of the founder team, a strategic consultant with regulatory expertise and legal counsel. Business plans now routinely surpass 250 pages and legal requirements continue to expand. When choosing these partners, it is important they have experience in submitting de novo applications in recent years as nuances continue to evolve. Further, ensure all the fees paid are "success based,” so applicable expenses are aligned to the accomplishment of specific milestones.

Regulatory changes, market opportunities and industry consolidations have created an environment in which a de novo bank can form and flourish. With the right founding group and partners, now is the time to explore being part of the next wave of de novo banking.

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Nicholas Graham is the managing director and De Novo SME for FinPro. He can be reached at 908-234-9398 ext. 111.