How the New FASB Standard on Revenue Recognition May Impact Banks


revenue-maze.jpgThe Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) recently released its long-awaited standard addressing revenue recognition. Existing U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) were largely developed on a piecemeal basis and are industry- or transactional-focused. Consequently, economically similar transactions sometimes resulted in different revenue recognition. Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2014-09, “Revenue From Contracts With Customers (Topic 606),” adopts a standardized approach for revenue recognition. This was a joint effort with the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), resulting in converged guidance under both GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Of course, companies will report the same total amount of revenue over time, but the timing of the recognition could be accelerated or delayed when compared with current practices. 

A Core Principle and a Five-Step Approach

The new ASU is based on a core principle: “Recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.” To achieve this principle, the guidance spells out several steps that a company must take when determining when to recognize revenue on its financial statements.

  1. Identify the contract with a customer.
  2. Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.
  3. Determine the transaction price.
  4. Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.
  5. Recognize revenue when (or as) performance obligations are satisfied.

Is This a Big Deal for Banks? 

The new ASU could be a challenge from two perspectives. First, there are certain industries for which there will be wholesale changes, including the software, telecommunication and real estate industries. For the banking industry, wholesale changes are not expected—largely because much of a bank’s revenue comes from financial instruments (including debt securities, loans and derivatives), and many of those are scoped out. That is not to say that banks won’t be affected, because most will. But for most banks, the effect is not likely to be significant.

Second, the challenge for banks (as well as other industries) will be taking the core principle and accompanying steps and figuring out how the guidance applies. In other words, the five steps provided are not written with a specific industry in mind, so a shift in thinking will be necessary to evaluate how the accounting will change for those transactions that will apply to banks. A few areas of potential application for banks include:

  • Loyalty point programs
  • Asset management fees
  • Credit card interchange fees
  • Deposit account fees

Effective Dates

The boards provided a lengthy implementation time for the new rules, giving companies time to develop and put in place new controls and processes. The ASU is effective for public companies for annual reporting periods (including interim reporting periods within) beginning after Dec. 15, 2016; early implementation is not allowed. For nonpublic companies, the guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after Dec. 15, 2017, and interim and annual reporting periods thereafter. Early adoption is permitted for nonpublic companies with certain caveats.

Help Is on the Way

In addition to establishing a revenue recognition working group to own the guidance, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) created 16 different industry task forces charged with providing industry-specific guidance. One of those 16 task forces is the depository institutions revenue recognition task force. With the issuance of the standard, the work now can begin.

In addition, the FASB and the IASB are forming a joint transition resource group, which will consist of 15 to 20 specialists representing preparers, auditors, regulators, users, and other stakeholders. Its objective will be to promote effective implementation and transition.

At just more than 700 pages, the new standard is the longest the FASB has ever issued. This was a major undertaking by the boards, and given the girth of the standard and the fact that it is not industry specific, it’s safe to say it’s just going to take time to digest. 

The Revenue Is Not Coming Back: It’s Time to Manage Costs Differently


The revenue’s not coming back: PwC partners John Garvey, Bob Lieberberg & Bob Ross discuss the results of a new study, and why financial firms must focus on expense management to achieve the results they desire.

Related PwC Publication:
PwC Viewpoint: The Revenue is Not Coming Back: It’s Time to Manage Costs Differently

Additional Resources: