A Deeper Dive Into Board Pay

How you pay your board may have a surprising effect on its total pay package, according to Bank Director’s 2020 Compensation Survey. This exclusive analysis has been created specifically for members of our Bank Services program.

Across asset sizes, banks paying an annual retainer generally award more total compensation to the board compared to their fee-only peers or those that award a mix of the two. This analysis focuses solely on cash compensation for the full board, in the form of meetings fees and retainers. Committee compensation is excluded due to variances in structure and meeting frequency, although 63% award committee fees.

Estimated Annual Pay, by Type and Asset Size

 >$10B$1B – $10B$500M – $1B$250M – $500M<$250MAll Banks
Annual Retainer Only$595,000$380,000$312,750$180,000$150,000$400,000
Meeting Fee Only$921,000$120,000$140,000$105,000$65,000$107,500
Both Retainer + Fees$225,000$118,000$90,000$85,400$77,500$105,000

*Estimated annual pay assumes 10 directors per board and 10 meetings per year, based on the 2020 Compensation Survey.

The low usage of meeting fees by banks above $10 billion in assets, and of annual retainers by banks below $500 million in assets, result in smaller data sets for those groups.

So, are retainer-only banks overpaying their boards? Are fee-only banks underpaying theirs?

Board responsibilities have risen greatly since the last financial crisis more than a decade ago. Regulators expect more from directors; while the buck stops with the CEO, that individual ultimately reports to the board. So, while it’s hard to say what’s right and what’s wrong when it comes to board pay, the gradual, increased use of annual retainers — from 61% five years ago to 70% today — reflects a realization by many boards that their members are spending more time outside of meetings on bank matters, whether that’s reviewing board packets or educating themselves on issues important to the oversight of the bank.

Annual retainers can better demonstrate the amount of the work directors put in. 

What’s more, technology has expanded how the board can meet. Some boards already offered phone and video conferencing options to more-remote members, like snowbirds who head south for the winter. The Covid-19 pandemic forced entire boards to adopt these measures, so they could become a more permanent feature for some. Should those attending virtually be compensated differently?

Annual Cash Compensation Per Director, by Type and Asset Size

 >$10B$1B – $10B$500M – $1B$250M – $500M<$250MAll Banks
Annual Retainer Only$59,500$38,000$31,275$18,000$15,000$40,000
Meeting Fee Only$92,100$12,000$14,000$10,500$6,500$10,750
Both Retainer + Fees$45,000$28,000$22,500$17,900$14,500$24,000

*Estimated annual pay per director assumes 10 meetings per year, based on the 2020 Compensation Survey. The low usage of meeting fees by banks above $10 billion in assets, and of annual retainers by banks below $500 million in assets, result in smaller data sets for those groups.

Getting the compensation mix right is vital to attracting the new talent a board needs to oversee the bank. Boards are often seeking someone younger. They may be looking to add gender or ethnic diversity. Or they may be looking for new skills.

While the 2017 Compensation Survey indicated that directors serve for loftier reasons than a supplemental paycheck — 62% cited personal growth as the top reason they serve — new, younger directors could be balancing an already high-pressure career with family obligations. And other organizations could be seeking their valuable time. Your bank likely isn’t the only one in its community on the hunt for board talent.

“It’s difficult to fully compensate someone for their time as a director,” says Flynt Gallagher, president of Compensation Advisors. “If you’re going to pay them for the time they put in, the skills they bring to the board — they’d be unaffordable.”

But boards still need to make it worthwhile to serve. Simultaneously, they may feel pressure to maintain current pay levels during the economic downturn.

Compensation committees could consider awarding equity compensation, which wasn’t factored into this analysis. Equity provides a way to pay directors more — and gives them additional skin in the game — without having an outsized effect on total compensation. Roughly half of survey respondents, primarily at public banks, awarded equity to outside directors in fiscal year 2019, at a median fair market value of $30,000. 

Bank Director’s 2020 Compensation Survey, sponsored by Compensation Advisors, surveyed 265 independent directors, CEOs, human resources officers and other senior executives of U.S. banks to understand trends around the acquisition of talent, CEO performance and pay, and director compensation. The survey was conducted in March and April 2020. Compensation data for directors and CEOs for fiscal year 2019 was also collected from the proxy statements of 98 publicly traded banks. Fifty-three percent of the total data represent financial institutions above $1 billion in assets; 59% are public.

Several units in Bank Director’s Online Training Series focus on compensation matters. You can also learn more about finding new talent for the board by reading “Cast a Wider Net for Your Next Director” and “How to Recruit Younger Directors.” If you’re considering virtual meetings, read “Best Practices for Virtual Board Meetings” to learn more about navigating that shift.