LIBOR Changes On the Horizon for Syndicated Loans on Bank Books

LIBOR-9-2-19.pngAlthough the shift from LIBOR to a new reference rate is several years away, banks should start preparing today.

Syndicated loans make up only 1.7% of the nearly $200 trillion debt market that is tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), a figure that includes derivatives, loan, securities and mortgages. But many banks hold syndicated loans on their balance sheets, and will be directly affected by efforts to replace LIBOR with a new reference rate.

In 2014, federal bank regulators convened the Alternative Rates Reference Committee (ARRC) in response to the manipulation of LIBOR by banks during the financial crisis. In 2017, the ARRC identified the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR) as the rate that represents best practice to replace LIBOR in USD derivative and other financial contracts.

Shifting from LIBOR to SOFR requires various moving pieces to converge as well as addressing legacy issues for existing contracts tied to LIBOR. The ARRC was reconstituted in 2018 with an expanded membership that includes regulators, trade associations, exchanges and other intermediaries, and buy side and sell side market participants. The group now oversees the implementation of the Paced Transition Plan and coordinates with cash and derivatives markets as they address the risk that LIBOR may not exist beyond 2021. This includes minimizing the potential disruption associated with LIBOR’s potential phase-out and supporting a voluntary transition away from LIBOR.

In April 2019, the ARRC released proposed fallback language that firms could incorporate into syndicated loan credit agreements during initial origination, or by way of amendment before the cessation of LIBOR occurs.

Contracts need recommended fallback language to provide consistency across products and institutions. The definition of LIBOR, the trigger events that would require use of the fallbacks and the fallbacks themselves vary significantly — even within the same product sets. Additionally, existing contractual fallback language was originally intended to address a temporary unavailability of LIBOR, like a glitch affecting the designated screen page or a temporary market disruption, not its permanent discontinuation. Until recently, fallback language rarely addressed the possibility of the permanent discontinuance of LIBOR. As a result, legacy fallback language could result in unintended economic consequences or potential litigation.

The ARRC recommends contracts have two sets of fallback language for new originations of U.S. dollar-denominated syndicated loans that reference LIBOR. Syndicated loan fallback provisions try to balance several goals of the ARRC: flexibility and clarity.

  1. Hardwired Approach:” This approach uses clear and observable triggers and successor rates with spread adjustments that are subject to some flexibility to fall back to an amendment if the designated successor rates and adjustments are not available at the time a trigger event becomes effective.
  2. Amendment Approach:” This approach is meant to offer standard language, which provides specificity with respect to the fallback trigger events and explicitly includes an adjustment to be applied to the successor rate, if necessary, to make the successor rate more comparable to LIBOR. It also includes an objection right for “Required Lenders.” In the Amendment Approach language, all decisions about the successor rate and adjustment will be made in the future.

As the market continues to prepare for LIBOR’s eventual exit, there are several steps that BancAlliance recommends that banks take to prepare for this transition:

  1. Quantify, document and monitor exposure to loans in your portfolio with LIBOR-based pricing.
  2. Ensure that executives are familiar with the current LIBOR fallback language in the individual credit agreements within the portfolio.
  3. Be mindful should any amendments occur to your existing portfolio, as SOFR’s acceptance grows in the marketplace.
  4. Continue observing new originations to see how fallback language is being drafted, and any other structural changes with regards to LIBOR.
  5. Review ARRC pronouncements and market-related current events to ensure your institution is up to speed on the latest news and changes with respect to LIBOR.

What’s Changed In Business Lending



In today’s fast-moving world, business leaders expect quick decisions, and forward-thinking banks are speeding up the loan process to serve clients in less than three minutes. So what’s changed — and what hasn’t changed — in commercial lending? In this video, Bill Phelan of PayNet explains that relationships still drive business banking and shares how the development of those relationships has changed. He also provides an update on Main Street credit trends.

  • How Banks Are Enhancing Credit Processes
  • New Ways to Build Relationships
  • Small Business Credit Trends

How Spreadsheets Add Risk to Construction Lending


lending-4-11-19.pngMillennials are entering the housing market with a force, yet low inventory across the country is stalling their dreams of homeownership. Now is the time for lenders to either begin or ramp up their construction loan programs. These niche loan products are a great addition to any book of business, but to be successful you have to be able to manage and service the loan after it closes.

Post close actions have traditionally been done with spreadsheets. This method, while fairly understood, is actually limiting and prone to formula errors. Additionally, spreadsheets naturally reach a tipping point in a team’s ability to scale and share reportable data with management and others in the organization. This puts loan completion in jeopardy and creates more risk to the lender.

The Limits of Spreadsheets to Manage Construction Lending
Spreadsheets can only do what they are designed to do—no more and no less. As your program grows, you are bound to reach the point where a spreadsheet is no longer functionally efficient and becomes a risky way to manage your pipeline.

  • Limited Visibility Into the Life of the Loan: Each loan has many different data points and touches over time, and housing them in a spreadsheet is basically burying important and vital information every time the loan is touched. It’s nearly impossible to see history, anticipate the future—and most importantly, clearly see problems before they arise. Spreadsheets force a reactive instead of a proactive method, which means a lender who is using spreadsheets is always playing catch-up.
  • No Reporting: Can you open up the spreadsheet right now and easily and accurately report on the pipeline, draw reports or consultant reports? The answer is probably no. And what do you do when you need to produce 1098 or 1099 reports? How do spreadsheets support these requirements? Getting your 1098s or 1099s from spreadsheets is a tedious, manual process prone to error. If you have a good quantity of construction loans, this is a large undertaking, and is difficult to scale. As you consider spreadsheets, consider the additional work that those spreadsheets will cost you over time.
  • A Finite Number Of Loans One Person Can Manage: Spreadsheets require a lot of time to properly manage one loan, and we have found that dedicated and experienced construction loan administrators can typically manage 35 to 50 loans using spreadsheets at one time. Any more than this usually adds to poor customer service.
  • Drains In-house Resources: If your program is doing well and your origination volume is growing, team members are limited in scale before a new hire must be acquired to take on more loans. Throwing bodies at the problem is not the best solution.
  • Location, Location, Location: Spreadsheets, no matter if they are stored on the cloud or on desktops, are still accessed by individual devices. You are now limited to these single failure points. What are the implications of losing this data, or the individual that knows how it works?
  • No Tracking: A spreadsheet does not offer tracking, task automation, complaint management, event monitoring, risk analysis and draw validations to ensure that the loan is meeting all of its milestones and risk requirements. As a workaround, lenders turn to the sticky note to help them keep track of important dates and actions. We all know the ineffective nature of this system, especially as key factors such as deadlines for draws, inspections, liens or permit expirations often get lost in the sticky note shuffle.
  • No Compliance Monitoring: Spreadsheets cannot keep you in compliance with government regulations, state statutes, loan program requirements, internal compliance, in-house policies/procedures or industry best practices. In order to maintain strict compliance, spreadsheets require constant vigilance. This may be their biggest limitation.

If Not Spreadsheets, Then What?
Spreadsheets just don’t cut it for construction loan management. Lenders who want to increase revenue while adding fewer additional resources need a digital construction loan management solution. Digital solutions reduce risk, improve efficiencies, allow scale and provide a better customer experience. Not to mention it keeps track of every small, yet critical, part of the construction loan. Never again will you be questioning if you are over-dispersing funds. Digital solutions, especially those that are cloud-based, can alleviate all the limitations of spreadsheets and the tipping point will be a thing of the past. Once you are running on this new level, you can bring more revenue and smart growth to your organization.

The Huge Lending Opportunity You’re Overlooking


entrepreneur-4-12-19.pngSince opening her Brooklyn-based gym, HIIT Box, four years ago, Maryam Zadeh has been featured for her fitness expertise in publications like Marie Claire magazine and Self.com. This exposure has caused business to explode.

The number of clients and revenue have tripled, she says. HIIT Box has relocated three times in four years to pursue more space. And there’s still a waitlist to join.

But despite this success, Zadeh has struggled to obtain the capital she needs to keep up with the rapid growth of her business. She initially invested her own money—a $13,000 inheritance—and later obtained $35,000 from American Express (her payment processor, through its working capital program) and two smaller loans totaling $27,000 from the online lending platform Biz2Credit.

But it wasn’t enough, and other lenders turned her down when she sought additional capital to move into a bigger space. So, she turned to customers to fill the funding gap, offering her 40 largest clients a discount if they paid a lump sum up front. Twenty-three clients took advantage of her offer. “That’s what gave us that big chunk of money [for] construction, because no lender would give it to us,” says Zadeh.

Growing pains like these are common among female entrepreneurs.

Women own more than 11 million businesses in the U.S., or 39 percent of businesses, according to a 2017 study commissioned by American Express—a number that has risen over the past 2 decades. A Bank of America survey published last year found that 56 percent of female entrepreneurs plan to grow their business over the next five years. To do so, however, many of them will need to raise capital.

“Women-owned firms face persistent funding gaps and funding source mismatches,” according to a study published in 2016 by the Federal Reserve Banks of New York and Kansas City. Twenty-eight percent of women-owned firms applying for a loan over the previous year were not approved for any funds, and 64 percent obtained less money than they needed.

Some banks have developed educational programs to better engage this potentially lucrative demographic.

Renasant Bank, based in Tupelo, Mississippi, launched its “Nest” program in March, which provides financial education to female entrepreneurs. It’s part of a larger bank-wide program focused on developing female leaders, both in the community and within the bank.

Tracey Morant Adams, the chief community development and corporate social responsibility officer at the $13 billion asset bank, saw that female entrepreneurs often weren’t as comfortable discussing the financial position of their business. They also didn’t understand the financing options available to them and were more likely to rely on personal wealth—dipping into their retirement savings, for example—to fund their small business.

Renasant will use a lunch-and-learn format to explain financial basics—how to read pro forma financial statements, for example—so women can gain the confidence and knowledge they need to understand their financial position. Renasant will also explain the funding solutions available, and how to understand which one is the best fit for their business—when a line of credit is more appropriate than a credit card, for instance.

Ultimately, at least in theory, some of these women will seek a loan or deepen their relationship with the bank. “You have to be intentional and deliberate in your efforts to reach out and find that business,” says Adams. “The Nest is going to allow us to be more intentional, particularly in that female space.”

Bank of America’s study asked female entrepreneurs to identify solutions to address the funding gap women face. Twenty-four percent pointed to education—echoing the importance of programs like Renasant’s.

But even more women—42 percent—pointed to the need for gender-blind financing to reduce the role that unconscious bias—and outright sexism—play in the loan application process.

When she’s applied for capital, Zadeh—the CEO and sole founder of her company—has been asked where her (male) partner is. Some have assumed she was running a yoga studio, not a gym. She’s even been asked if she can do push-ups. (She can.)

Women—and small business owners in general—are more likely to be approved for a business loan by a small bank than any other option, according to the FedTwitter_Logo_Blue.png But despite higher approval rates at small banks, women are more likely to seek funding from a large bank or online lender.

business-loans-chart.png 

Stories like Zadeh’s may explain what’s driving women to online lenders and larger banks. “Everything is driven by the data, and there is no possibility of any kind of gender bias,” says Rob Rosenblatt, the head of lending for the online lending platform Kabbage.

Applying online, in theory, reduces bias, so a female applicant could be more optimistic that her loan would be approved.

For women seeking to grow their businesses, access to capital can make a big difference—and expand lending opportunities for the banks that enhance their efforts to this group.

The Secret To Mortgage Lending To First-Time Buyers

mortgage-2-11-19.pngMarket volatility and interest rate hikes have created uncertainty for the entire mortgage industry. Lending portfolio growth has also met pressure from the tight housing supply and the influence of fintech on the mortgage process.
One bright spot in the coming years will undoubtedly be the first-time homebuyer market, but banks must adapt traditional lending practices to capitalize and compete successfully.

First-time home purchasers are now 33 percent of potential buyers. Some surveys have indicated millennials–the largest future housing buyer population–are starting to embrace home ownership. Crafting effective loan options for this demographic can provide opportunity for mortgage and home equity portfolio growth, achieve consumers’ home ownership goals and deliver beneficial partnerships between banks and borrowers for years.

Banks must address the following concerns with the first-time buyer:

  • Affordability: They are more likely to seek popular urban and so-called “surban” (new or redeveloped areas with an urban feel) environments to live. Today’s first-time buyers are enticed by alternative housing choices that typically have higher-priced entry points. Traditional builders have not focused on this sector due to profitability pressures from increased labor and materials costs, leading to a limited supply of entry-level housing. Rising interest rates further stress affordability factors for the first-time buyer and limit the options available for mortgage funding. 
  • Debt and Lack of Savings: More than 50 percent of millennials carry a rising amount of debt, with the average 2016 graduate holding more than $37,000 in student loans compared to $18,000 for the average 2003 graduate, according to Forbes. The pressure of this debt load means would-be buyers have little or no savings available for the traditional 20 percent down payment. Rate increases, especially on adjustable student loans, can exacerbate this issue for the first-time buyer though Redfin predicts a competitive labor market should bring higher wages in 2019.
  • Income and Alternative Purchase Structures: The rise of the “gig economy” has led to a high number of independent contractors in this cohort, according to Forbes. Emerging first-time buyers have also shown interest in purchasing homes to create opportunities for rental income and nontraditional co-borrowers.

Lenders can differentiate their approval process from competitors by empowering loan underwriters with structures and guidelines that address the unique challenges of the first-time borrower. Revising mortgage guidelines and devising strategies for affordable home ownership will create valuable long-term relationships with first-time homebuyers. Just a few approaches to consider are:

  • Rethinking Loan Parameters: Mixed-use properties and home-improvement loans are typically excluded from the primary mortgage process. Banks incorporating alternative building structure options and creating allowances for home renovations in the initial mortgage parameters can substantially increase the pool of homes available to buyers. 
  • Differentiating Loan Structures: Traditional mortgages may be out of reach for many first-time buyers and may not address alternative housing solutions. While options with a higher loan-to-value ratio exist, most require mortgage insurance and are subject to increased scrutiny. Pairing conforming first mortgages with home equity loans and lines offer affordable loan structures at higher loan-to-value ratios and create long-term relationships. With proper planning, including the possible use of portfolio protection products, these structures can be offered without adding risk to the bank’s loan portfolio. 
  • Diversifying Income and Debt Guidelines: Considering tenant income and/or co-borrowers may be the only option for a potential buyer to enter the housing market. In addition, banks may also need to expand guidelines to allow for alternate sources of income, such as independent contracting income, in the underwriting decision process. 

Even with numerous obstacles, first-time home buyers offer opportunity in the mortgage origination market. Addressing the needs of this sector while avoiding the risks, lenders can create profitable mortgage and home equity portfolios, which may be the best way to mitigate the uncertainty of traditional lending in the future.

NFP is a leading insurance broker and consultant that provides employee benefits, property and casualty, retirement, and individual private client solutions through our licensed subsidiaries and affiliates. Our expertise is matched only by our personal commitment to each client’s goals.

5 Critical Components for Construction Lending Success


lending-12-31-18.pngThe tough reality is that bankers are experiencing margin compression due to the current state of the yield curve and rising interest rates.

Without refinances to process, and new mortgages growing rarer, they must rely on other types of loan products. Enter construction loans.

Construction lending was once a vital part of a healthy loan product mix. Of course, many bankers will point directly at TRID, or the Know Before You Owe mortgage disclosure rules, as their roadblock to originating construction loans. Support for TRID, like many other regulatory rules, hasn’t been prevalent in the industry, and some bankers don’t have the information they need to mitigate risk.

So what now? Who is offering support for these regulations? And how can lenders begin construction lending again?

Instead of giving up on construction lending, most community banks have all the resources they need to start and maintain a successful construction lending program; it’s all at their fingertips.

To become successful in construction lending, you need these five components to all work together:

1. Support in the C-suite and boardroom
Before looking at solutions, your board must have a consensus on whether or not to even launch the program. Construction lending programs require effort from several C-level executives and the board. Everyone in the C-suite and boardroom need to be on the same page. Having this consensus helps assemble and maintain a successful program.

2. Your Loan Origination System (LOS)
Sometimes lenders don’t know where to begin with a construction loan program, particularly with respect to staying compliant with TRID. It can surprise lenders that the fields and forms required to support construction loans may be available through their LOS. Work with your LOS provider to diagnose how other lenders have utilized the LOS platform when offering construction loan products, particularly the production of the lender’s estimate (LE) and closing document (CD). If your LOS solution does not support construction loans, there are other workarounds in order to still reach the end goal, such as using a document service provider.

3. Specialized document service provider
Mitigating risk and pleasing all who are involved in a construction loan isn’t easy given how many moving parts are involved. It can be done with the proper resources. Document service providers are one of the most important elements to have. The provider gives lenders the specific form needed for each step of the project, no matter if the project is down the street or across state lines.

Before you sign on with any document service provider, make sure of three things:

  • They are able to produce both the LE and CD, particularly if your LOS doesn’t provide them. 
  • They are able to provide the state-specific documents that are going to be needed in the closing package.
  • They are able to guarantee that their documents will protect your first lien priority in each state.

4. In-house subject matter expert
Before the financial crash 10 years ago, construction loan expertise was abundant. But a decade after the recession, experts on construction lending can be difficult to find inside the bank. Finding or recruiting somebody like this on your team can be an amazing resource. They can be helpful in educating other lenders and assist in problem-solving loan structuring to benefit the entire company.

5. Post-close draw management and servicing
How do you manage the cost and process involved after you close that construction loan? Loan servicing is an integral piece of construction lending, and it is very hands-on and specific. Once the loan is closed, someone must be servicing this loan to ensure success for the duration of the construction loan: managing first lien priority, draw administration, inspections, and communication with key stakeholders such as the borrower and contractors. At the end of the day, you need someone to manage the lenders’ holdback, while simultaneously protecting the physical, financial, and legal interests of your bank.

Beyond Spreadsheets: Digitizing Construction Lending



Many banks rely on spreadsheets and personal contact to oversee and manage construction loans—methods that are ineffective today. How can financial institutions improve this process? In this video, Built CEO Chase Gilbert explains how upgrading technology and making the process digital creates efficiencies for both bank and borrower, and allows for better risk management capabilities.

  • Why Digitize Construction Lending
  • Efficiency Gains and Other Benefits
  • Confronting Common Obstacles

Five Reasons Why You Should Reconsider Short-Term Loans


lending-7-16-18.pngFor the better part of a decade, regulatory agencies have placed obstacles in front of banks that all but prohibited them from offering short-term, small-dollar lending options for their customers. Now, at least one major regulator has signaled a shift in its opinion about those products, which should inspire banks to reconsider those options.

Here are five reasons banks often cite when discussing why they don’t offer short-term, small-dollar options, and a case why they should rethink those ideas.

You don’t think your customers need it
Perhaps many of your branches are in affluent areas, or you believe that your customers have access to other types of short-term liquidity. But the statistics regarding American personal finances may surprise you:

Nearly 50 percent of American consumers lack the necessary savings to cover a $400 emergency, according to the Federal Reserve.
The personal savings rate dipped to 2.8 percent in April 2018, the lowest rate in over a decade, according to the St. Louis Fed.
Each year 12 million Americans take out payday loans, spending $9 billion on loan fees, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Based on these statistics, it’s likely that a portion of your customer base is affected by the lack of savings, or has a need for better access to liquidity, and chances are good that they’d be receptive to a small-dollar, short-term loan solution.

It’s Cost and Resource Prohibitive
For most financial institutions, introducing a traditional small-dollar loan program is cost-prohibitive–operationally, and from a staffing standpoint. From the cost of loan officers and underwriters to the overhead, the reality is it would take time and resources many banks do not have.

Enter fintech firms, bringing proprietary technology and the application of big data. The right fintech partner can manage the time, human and financial resources you may not have, such as application, underwriting and loan signing processes. In some cases, the whole thing can be automated, resulting in a “self-service” program for your customers, eliminating the human resource need.

Underwriting Challenges and Charge-Off Concerns
Another challenge is the loan approval process and how to underwrite these unique loans. A determination of creditworthiness by a traditional credit check does not adequately predict the consumer’s current ability to repay using recent behavior instead of a period of many years. Today’s fintech firms use proprietary technology to underwrite the loans, incorporating a variety of factors to mitigate charge-offs.

The OCC recently released a bulletin outlining “reasonable policies and practices specific to short-term, small-dollar installment lending.” It stated such policies would generally include “analysis that uses internal and external data sources, including deposit activity, to assess a consumer’s creditworthiness and to effectively manage credit risk.” The right fintech partner will apply big data solutions to assess creditworthiness using the OCC’s criteria and other factors.

Compliance Burdens
There’s no question short-term loan options have been heavily regulated over the past eight years. The CFPB placed predatory lending and payday loans under scrutiny. In 2013, the OCC and FDIC effectively ended banks’ payday loan alternative, the deposit advance. The CFPB cracked down even harder in October 2017 with their final payday lending rule, which had the potential to devastate the storefront payday loan industry, forcing consumers to seek alternative sources of quick liquidity.

The pressure is easing. The OCC was the first agency to encourage banks to make responsible and efficient small-dollar loans. If history has taught us anything, it’s that the other regulatory agencies likely will soon follow suit.

Concern About Cannibalizing Overdraft Revenue
Exclusive data collected by fintech firms experienced with overdraft management has shown there are two distinct groups of consumers managing their liquidity needs in different ways:

The Overdrafters
These are consumers that struggle with transaction timing and incur overdraft or NSF fees. A significant portion of this group might have irregular income streams, such as small business owners or commissioned salespeople. In many cases, these consumers are aware of their heavy overdraft activity, and will continue to overdraft, because for them, it makes financial sense.

The Loan-Seekers
A second group includes those consumers who simply lack the cash to promptly pay their bills, and either can’t obtain adequate overdraft limits or failed to opt-in to overdraft services. These consumers are actively seeking small-dollar loans to avoid the double whammy of hefty late fees and negative hits to their credit score for late payments.

Savvy financial institutions will ensure they have the programs in place to serve both groups of consumers, and fill the gap for the second category by using an automated small-dollar lending program with sound underwriting from a trusted fintech vendor.

Rethinking the FICO Score


FICO-6-20-18.pngFor decades, pre-dating many banking careers today, the tried and true method to evaluate credit applications from individual consumers was their FICO score. More than 10 billion credit scores were purchased in 2013 alone, a clear indicator of how important they are to lenders. But is it time for the banking industry to reconsider its use of this metric?

The FICO score, produced by Fair Isaac Corp. using information from the three major credit bureaus—Equifax, TransUnion and Experian—has been considered the gold standard for evaluating consumer credit worthiness. It focuses squarely on the concentration of credit, payment history and the timeliness of those payments. FICO scores have generally proven to be a reliable indicator for banks and other lenders, but in an age operating at light speed, in which many purchases can be made in seconds, a score that can fluctuate in a matter of days might be heading toward obsolescence.

Some believe a person’s credit score should be considered only in parity with other, more current indicators of consumer behavior. A study released in April by the National Bureau of Economic Research says even whether people choose an Apple or Samsung phone “is equivalent to the difference in default rates between a median FICO score and the 80th percentile of the FICO score.”

Consider the following example. A consumer pays off an auto loan, resulting in a reduction in their FICO score. This is largely due to the reduced amount of credit extended. That reduced score could become a deciding factor if the customer has applied for, but not yet closed, a mortgage 60 or so days before paying off the vehicle and could affect the interest rate of the applicant.

That leaves a bitter taste for anyone with average or above average credit who has demonstrated financial responsibility and, it could be reasonably argued, would be a much better candidate for credit extension than someone with the same score who doesn’t give two flips about the regular ebbs and flows in their credit.

For all its inherent benefits to the industry, the traditional credit score isn’t perfect. Banks could be using their own troves of customer data to evaluate their credit applications more accurately, more fairly or more often. This could be a boon for institutions hoping to grow their deposit base or enhance their loan portfolios. Some regulators have indicated their attention to this approach as well. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.’s Winter 2017 Supervisory Insights suggests data could be a helpful indicator of risk and encouraged member institutions to be more “forward-thinking” in their credit risk management.

“As new risks emerge, an effective credit [management information system] program is sufficiently flexible to expand or develop new reporting to assess the effect those risks may have on the institution’s operations,” the agency said.

That suggests the FICO score banks are currently using might not tell the full story about how responsible credit applicants might be.

“My personal opinion is that among most people, if you have someone who thinks about [their digital footprint and credit], you’re already talking about people who are financially quite sophisticated,” Tobias Berg, the lead author of the NBER study and an associate professor at Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, told Wired Magazine recently. The study examined a number of data points that go far beyond what is incorporated in a FICO score.

That certainly has value for banks. The data they already collect about their customers could be used to determine credit worthiness, but there’s a counter argument to be made. Digital footprints are much easier to manipulate more quickly over time by changing usernames, search history, devices and the like. Using an Android over a more expensive iPhone could be a negative in the study’s findings, for example, which might not reflect the customer’s true credit profile.

But FICO scores are not reviewed as regularly as they could be, and a swing of a couple dozen points from one moment to another can significantly sway some credit applications.

For now, fully abandoning the FICO score isn’t a likely or manageable option for banks, nor one that’s favored by regulators, but the inclusion of digital data in credit applications is something that could be adapted and be beneficial to both the bank and customers eager to expand that relationship with their institution.

Enhancing the Lending Process Through Data



Customers today expect quicker decisions, and data can empower banks to improve the customer experience. Data can also enable growth as banks gain more and better information about their customers. In this video, Steve Brennan of Validis outlines how banks can confront the challenges they face in making the most of their data.

  • How Data Has Transformed Lending
  • The Benefits of Leveraging Data
  • The Challenges Banks Face
  • Addressing Data Deficiencies