The Significance of Size, Scale and Structure in BOLI

A bank is only as strong as its people, its client base and its assets. If your bank owns bank-owned life insurance (BOLI) among its assets, it’s important to know that your BOLI is only as strong as your BOLI insurance provider.

Bank executives familiar with the broad contours of BOLI may not be aware of other important considerations relative to their policies — considerations that may be unique to the product or the insurance carrier. Understanding these nuances can provide valuable insights into the resiliency, financial stability, and performance of your BOLI policy.

BOLI can be one of the most attractive assets on a bank’s balance sheet; in a low-rate environment with market volatility, it’s a good idea to consider including BOLI as part of a well thought-out asset strategy.

Two popular approaches for determining the crediting rates applicable to general account BOLI products are the “portfolio rate” and the “new money rate” methods. The new money rate method features crediting rates based on currently available securities, whereas portfolio-rate general account BOLI policies feature crediting rates based on the performance of an underlying seasoned portfolio. Crediting rates derived from well-diversified, low-turnover portfolios can serve as a form of hedge against volatile and lower market interest rates, while a new money rate product can benefit during a period of persistent and material increased market interest rates.

Each BOLI policy’s minimum guaranteed rate is backed by the credit quality, size and diversification of the issuing insurer’s investment portfolio. A portfolio’s resilience and financial strength are derived from the interplay between the core of investment-grade fixed income securities and holdings of potentially higher-yielding assets.

When it comes to BOLI, size and scale matter. Larger insurers are typically better equipped to purchase and provide exposure to a wider range of diversified assets, which contribute to the portfolio’s yield and BOLI crediting rates that banks value. Smaller carriers may not necessarily have access to the wide range of investment asset classes and market opportunities relative to larger carriers like MassMutual.

Beyond comparisons of the carriers’ investment portfolios and crediting rate approaches, there can be important differences when it comes to the insurers themselves. Because there is a limited universe of BOLI carriers, and their capabilities and strengths vary, each carrier brings unique types and levels of resources to bear. Each insurer offers banks different results based on its investment philosophy and expertise in managing the general investment account underlying its BOLI policies. Certain characteristics that differentiate insurers from each other include company structure, business mix, asset/liability management strategy, access to less widely available investment opportunities, and culture. The expertise, breadth and depth of experience of the insurer’s investment and business professionals should not be overlooked.

As a large mutual life insurer, MassMutual has a dedicated investments group that leverages our expertise in fixed income, equities and alternative assets, including real estate. The asset managers are insurance investors first and foremost, and they understand the business and the characteristics of the liabilities that the investments support.

The mutual structure enables insurers like MassMutual to take a long-term perspective. Decisions made with the next several decades in mind, not the next quarter, better align with the long-term nature of BOLI assets. This long-term view fuels our approach to maintaining financial strength and stability and drives our competitiveness.

Further, a carrier’s long-term market presence and commitment can be aided by diversification within its own subsidiaries, business lines and income streams. Just like in banking, having a diverse set of businesses can help reduce the economic sensitivity of an insurer. Diversified insurance carriers that offer a variety of solutions with varying characteristics are built to weather economic cycles and provide stability to a carrier. The combination of diverse income streams with a diversified pool of assets is a sound approach to help endure a wide variety of economic environments.

Banks have a variety of options when it comes to which BOLI insurer they select. Understanding each carrier’s structure, business mix, investment philosophy and market approach can inform executives’ choices as they embark on financial relationships that last decades.

Insurance products issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual), Springfield, MA 01111-0001.

BOLI Carriers Prepare for COVID-19 Impact

Purchases of bank-owned life insurance were strong in 2019 as bankers capitalized on its attractive yields relative to other investments available to banks.

What 2020 holds remains to be seen, given trends in the market and broader economy. Total BOLI purchases likely could be lower this year, as carriers are generally not willing to accept large premiums from a single policyholder. However, BOLI activity in the $10 million and under purchase size may be similar to 2019 levels. At the close of the first quarter, it is too early to know the full impact of COVID-19, but we have a few observations based on discussions with several major BOLI carriers:

  1. The carriers have not priced in any risk premium for potentially higher mortality rates and do not expect to do so. In addition, the carriers do not expect to tighten the requirements to obtain guaranteed issue underwriting. In a guaranteed issue BOLI case, the insureds answer several questions, but no physicals are required. Guaranteed issue underwriting can be obtained with as few as 10 insureds.
  2. It is virtually impossible for carriers to find fixed income investments that produce yields that approximate the yield on the existing portfolio, given that short-term interest rates have dropped to near zero and the 10-year Treasury declined from 2.49% on April 1, 2019 to 62 basis points a year later.
  3. While carriers continue to accept new BOLI premium, some are reluctant to take a large premium from any one customer to avoid diluting the portfolio for existing policyholders. Movements in the yield of the portfolio tend to lag the market because carriers’ portfolios are very large (often $50 billion to $200 billion) and generally have a duration of five to 10 years. For this reason, current crediting rates for several carriers remain above 3%.
  4. Several carriers indicated that they started reducing credit exposure and increasing asset diversification several years ago. While they did not anticipate a pandemic, the market had been good for so long and they thought it would be wise to start reducing the risk in the portfolio ahead of a potential downturn. In addition, credit spreads had also narrowed, so there was less reward for additional risk.
  5. Carriers primarily invest in fixed-income investments; a decline in the stock market has minimal impact on most carrier investment portfolios.

BOLI Growth In 2019
BOLI purchases totaled $4.3 billion in 2019, an increase of 147% over the 2018 total, according to IBIS Associates, an independent market research firm. The total represents the third-highest amount of BOLI purchases in the past dozen years.

It’s even more impressive when considering that most banks continued to have strong loan demand and less liquidity than in most previous years. At year-end 2019, BOLI cash surrender value (CSV) held on the balance sheets of U.S. banks totaled $178 billion, according to the December 2019 NFP-Michael White report.

Robust BOLI activity has been driven by attractive tax-equivalent yields, strong credit quality and leverage ($1 invested in BOLI typically returns $3 to $4 of tax-free death benefits). Banks can use BOLI as a way to retain key employees by providing life insurance benefits or informally funding nonqualified benefit plans; BOLI earnings can also be used to offset and recover health care and 401(k) or other retirement plan expenses.

According to the IBIS report, 77% of 2019 BOLI purchases were for general account, 22% for variable separate account and just 1% was for hybrid separate account. In general account policies, the general assets of the insurance company issuing the policies support the CSV. In variable separate and hybrid separate products, the CSVs are legally segregated from the general assets of the carrier, which provides enhanced credit protection in the event of carrier insolvency. The credit risk and price risk of the underlying assets remain with the policyholder in a variable policy, whereas the carrier retains those risks in a general account or hybrid policy.

Purchases of variable separate accounts dominated the market in 2006-07; since that time, general account BOLI has typically led the way. This is due to the simplicity of general account products relative to variable separate products as well as the increased product options, generally higher yields, and the high comfort level bankers have with the creditworthiness of mainstream BOLI carriers.

According to the IBIS data, 2019 general account BOLI purchases were at their highest level in the last 16 years. According to the NFP-Michael White report, 3,346 banks — representing 64.6% of all US banks — now hold BOLI assets. This is an increase from the 64.1% of banks that held BOLI at the end of 2018. Seventy-one percent of banks with over $100 million in assets hold BOLI; 77.3% of banks with over $300 million in assets do.

The High Cost of Good Talent and the Value of Retention

How would your bank fare if your top-performing lenders left tomorrow?

A bank succeeds because of its employees who grow the bank and keep it safe. The departure of these employees can impose massive costs to a bank in lost relationships and the effort to find new personnel. Has management at your bank adequately assessed the financial cost and risk of losing its key employees? What would be the financial impact to the bottom line and shareholder value if a key employee is not retained?

The direct cost of replacing a high-performing employee is up to 213% of the annual salary associated with the position, according to research by the Society for Human Resource Management. Total costs can rise to as much as 400% when considering indirect expenses. Direct costs include screening, interviewing, acquisition cost, onboarding and training, while indirect costs include lost productivity, short-staffing, coverage cost and reduced morale.

The following are hypothetical examples that help illustrate both the costs and risks associated with replacing a key employee at a bank:

Example 1: A lender in their early 40s who maintains a $40 million loan portfolio with a 4% margin joins a competitor bank. The estimated earnings on the lender’s portfolio were $1.6 million. If 30% of the portfolio moves to the competing bank, that would create an annual impact of $480,000. The bank stands to lose $1.4 million in three years. Assuming this lender generates $10 million in new loans annually, that adds another $400,000 in additional lost income. Losing this one lender results in lost annual revenue of almost $900,000.

Now imagine the bank has seven lenders with similar portfolios and margins. If the entire team left, the lost revenue potential could be over $6 million annually.

Example 2: A bank loses its compliance officer. In addition to the direct financial costs of replacing the officer, this could cause both short- and long-term regulatory and financial risks and challenges. If the officer had a salary of $90,000, the cost to replace them is between $191,700 and $360,000, using the 213% and 400% of base salary replacement cost assumptions. There could also be additional costs associated with potential outsourcing the compliance services until the bank can hire a new compliance officer.

Fortunately, in both of these examples, management preemptively responded by strategically designing compensation programs to retain the officers. Quantifying the lost revenue and costs to replace the employees demonstrated the substantial risks to the bank, and convinced executives of the  inadequacies of the compensation plan in place.

It is critical that banks design and implement competitive compensation plans that provide meaningful benefits. Some compensation committees believe a salary and an annual performance bonus are adequate to retain key employees. But based on our experience, banks with higher retention rates offer two to four types of compensation plans, in addition to salary and bonus. Examples include employee stock ownership plans, stock options, restrictive stock, phantom stock, profit sharing, salary continuation plans and deferred compensation plans. These plans provide for payments either at retirement or while employed, or a combination of pre- and post-retirement payments. Banks can strategically design and customize these plans in ways that incentivize strong performance but fit the demographics and needs of the key personnel. There is no one-size-fits-all plan.

Additionally, nonqualified executive benefit programs such as supplemental executive retirement plans (SERPs) and deferred compensation plans (DCPs) can help your key employees accumulate supplemental funds for retirement. Their flexibility allows them to be used alongside other forms of compensation to enhance your bank’s overall executive benefit program by offering additional incentives and incorporating special features intended to retain top performers who may not be focused on retirement. For example, a deferred compensation plan with payments timed to when the officer’s children are college age can be highly valued by an officer fitting that demographic.

The significant potential financial impact when your bank loses key employees quantifies and underlines the value and importance of retention, so it is paramount that executives meaningfully and competitively compensate these employees. Banks without a strong corporate culture and a competitive compensation plan in place are at a higher risk of losing key employees and may have an emerging potential retention problem.

Using Succession Planning to Unlock Compensation Challenges

compensation-9-16-19.pngSuccession planning could be the key solution boards can use to address their biggest compensation challenges.

Succession planning is one of the most critical tasks for a bank’s board of directors, right up there with attracting talented executives and compensating them. But many boards miss the opportunity of allowing succession planning to drive talent retention and compensation. Banks can address two major challenges with one well-crafted plan.

Ideally, succession planning is an ongoing discussion between executive management and board members. Proper planning encourages banks to assess their current talent base for various positions and identify opportunities or shortfalls.

It’s not a static one-and-done project either. Directors should be aware of the problems that succession planning attempts to solve: preparing future leaders, filling any talent voids, attracting and retaining key talent, strategically disbursing training funds and ultimately, improving shareholder value.

About a third of respondents in the Bank Director’s 2019 Compensation Survey reported that “succession planning for the CEO and/or executives” was one of the biggest challenges facing their banks. More popular challenges included “tying compensation to performance,” “managing compensation and benefit costs,” and “recruiting commercial lenders.”

But in our experience, these priorities are out of order. Developing a strategic succession planning process can actually drive solutions to the other three compensation challenges.

There are several approaches boards can use to formulate a successful succession plan. But they should start by assessing the critical roles in the bank, the projected departure dates of those individuals, and information and guidance about the skills needed for each position.

Boards should be mindful that the current leaders’ skill sets may be less relevant or evolve in the future. Susan Rogers, organizational change expert and president of People Pinnacle, said succession planning should consider what skills the role may require in the future, based on a company’s strategic direction and trends in the industry and market.

The skills and experiences that got you where you are today likely won’t get you where you need to go in the future. We need to prepare future leaders for what’s ahead rather than what’s behind,” she said.

Once a board has identified potential successors, it can now design compensation plans that align their roles and training plans with incentives to remain with the organization. Nonqualified benefit plans, such as deferred compensation programs, can be effective tools for attracting and retaining key bank performers.

According to the American Bankers Association 2018 Compensation and Benefits Survey, 64% of respondents offered a nonqualified deferred compensation plan for top management. Their design flexibility means they can focus on both longer-term deferrals to provide retirement income or shorter-term deferrals for interim financial needs.

Plans with provisions that link benefits to the long-term success of the bank can help increase performance and shareholder value. Bank contributions can be at the board’s discretion or follow defined performance goals, and can either be a specific dollar amount or a percentage of an executive’s salary. Succession and training goals can also be incorporated into the plan’s award parameters.

Such plans can be very attractive to key employees, particularly the young and high performing. For example, assume that the bank contributes 8% of a $125,000 salary for a 37-year-old employee annually until age 65. At age 65, the participant could have an account balance equal to $1,470,000 (assuming a crediting rate equal to the bank’s return on assets (8%), with an annual payment of $130,000 per year for 15 years).

This same participant could also use a portion of the benefit to pay for college expenses for two children, paid for with in-service distributions from the nonqualified plan. Assume there are two children, ages three and seven, and the employee wants $25,000 a year to be distributed for each child for four years. These annual $25,000 distributions would be paid out when the employee was between ages 49 and 56. The remaining portion would be available for retirement and provide an annual benefit of $83,000 for 15 years, beginning at age 65.

Boards could use a plan like this in lieu of stock plans that have similar time horizons. This type of arrangement can be more enticing to younger leaders looking at shorter, more mid-term financial needs than a long-term incentive plan.

And many banks already have defined benefit-type supplemental retirement plans to recruit, retain, and reward key executives. These plans are very popular with executives who are 45 and older, because they provide specific monthly distributions at retirement age.

It is important that boards craft meaningful compensation plans that reward older and younger executives, especially when they are vital to the bank’s overall succession planning efforts and future success.

The Evolution of Strategic Business Objectives in Annual Incentive Plans


incentive-8-19-19.pngBoards are increasingly looking for ways to appropriately align pay and performance for bankers in the face of the disruptive changes in the industry.

Post-financial crisis, many bank boards shifted to a scorecard approach as a way to improve their compensation governance and accountability. However, industry disruption has sparked an evolution of the scorecard itself.

Before the financial crisis, determining annual bonus payouts at banks was a singular, annual event. The compensation committee and the CEO compared the bank’s current financial results to the prior year, assessed the operating environment, considered last year’s bonus pool and adjusted bonus accruals accordingly. Higher performers got a little more than prior year; poor performers looked for new jobs.

Following the financial crisis, a search for improved compensation governance and accountability ushered in a movement to construct incentive plans with payouts specifically tied to financial outcomes. This resulted in the popular financial scorecard approach used by many banks today.

Most scorecards include “hardwired” financial goals (usually earnings per share, net income and return on equity), banking-specific metrics (deposits, credit quality metrics and expense management) and a component that reflects “individual” or “discretionary” evaluations of performance.

Scorecards have served the industry well and addressed concerns that the lack of transparency into banking incentive plans resulted in shareholders being unclear of exactly what performance they were rewarding. The industry is now in the midst of a new phase of disruption that has banks reexamining their business models and entering a period of significant transformation.

In response, boards are increasingly enhancing the qualitative component of their scorecards to add balance and encompass the progress executives have made against clearly articulated strategic business objectives (SBOs). These strategic components balance the “backward-looking” nature of financial metrics with a “forward-looking” assessment that focuses on improving future financial performance.

Trends in Strategic Business Objectives
An SBO is a goal or metric that generally supports a key business priority and can be measured and objectively evaluated. For many boards, delivering against SBOs is critical to ensuring sustainability of their franchise. While growing earnings per share is a proven measure of current business success, achieving other critical outcomes is essential to creating long-term value for shareholders.

Detailed SBOs are specific to each bank and reflect where the bank is in its life cycle or period of transformation. Recently, we have observed banks incorporating the following eight categories into their SBOs for bank bonus plans:

  1. Executing the Digital Strategy: Depending on the bank’s current digital state, this category evaluates the success of critical milestones, such as percentage of paperless customers, “app” rollout and usage rates and expansion of service offerings through the digital interface.
  2. Technology Enhancements: This can include initiatives such as cybersecurity upgrades, automated fraud detection and general infrastructure enhancements like enterprise resource planning rollout.
  3. Corporate Development: This objective centers on the bank’s execution of its M&A strategy. It reflects the board’s evaluation of acquisitions, divestitures and integrations throughout the year. Banks often set goals based on quality, rather than quantity, to avoid incentivizing “bad deals.”
  4. Branch Strategy: This rewards the expansion, contraction or footprint-specific goals tied to the bank’s strategy for brick-and-mortar branch presence.
  5. Fee-Income Initiatives: Boards want to compensate for successful growing non-interest income from existing products, new products and complimentary service offerings.
  6. Customer Metrics: This can be measured through various means, such as net promoter score, internal customer satisfaction ratings, call center resolution rates and client retention statistics.
  7. Compliance: This generally focuses on the performance against anti-money laundering (AML) objectives and other regulator-specific compliance priorities.
  8. Risk Management: Boards define this SBO by evaluating process-related rollouts, infrastructure enhancements and talent upgrades across the risk function.

Banks are looking to drive their key initiatives during this time of significant transition in the industry. To do so, they are increasingly using SBOs to underpin the strategic drivers of future value creation in their business. Linking these initiatives to annual incentive compensation can communicate the importance of the strategies to the organization, and align compensation to the successful execution of these strategies.

A Compensation To-Do List For Your Board

Is your board effectively addressing the risk embedded in the bank’s compensation plans? McLagan Partner Gayle Appelbaum outlines a to-do list for boards in this video, and shares why new rules around hedging policies should be on your board’s radar. She also explains what banks need to know about these rules, along with considerations for your board’s annual compensation review.

  • Compensation Issues to Watch
  • New Rules on Hedging Practices
  • Other Practices to Address

What CEOs Want (and Directors Aren’t Giving)


compensation-7-12-19.pngChief executive officers at community banks want more equity, not more cash.

This is particularly true of community bank CEOs, who say that including equity in pay packages incentivizes them to create long-term shareholder value, aids management retention and prepares them to join the board.

While this shouldn’t come as a huge surprise, the message may be lost on some directors of these banks.

In Bank Director’s 2019 Compensation Survey—sponsored by Compensation Advisors—54 percent of CEOs said their bank should offer equity or increase the amount of equity they already provide. Directors didn’t feel as strongly about this: Only 19 percent said offering or increasing equity was a priority. They saw equity as one of a number of potential improvements, along with other options like non-equity long-term compensation, cash incentive and higher salary.

The board of directors at Talladega, Alabama-based FirstBanc of Alabama added stock grants to the compensation plan for President and CEO J. Chad Jones in 2017, after discussing how to incentivize and retain executive management. The board granted Jones 3,000 shares—1,000 of which were unrestricted and granted immediately, with the remainder consisting of restricted stock transferred over time.

“It has raised my eyebrows,” he says. “It certainly helped me focus on how to drive the stock and dividends.”

Adding the equity incentive “very minimally” diluted existing shareholders but allows Jones to benefit from the upside he creates. The board also approved a block of shares for other C-level officers, with which Jones can implement a similar equity grant program for them.

Jones added that increasing his salary beyond a certain point offered diminishing returns for him and higher expenses for First Bank of Alabama, which has $548.6 million in assets.

“You can give me 5 percent to 10 percent pay increases each year for the next 25 to 30 years. At that point in time, what good has it done?” he says. “I love the compensation side, don’t get me wrong, everyone does. But … if [the board] continues to increase my pay 5 percent and I’m the highest paid individual in this company, it doesn’t make sense for [them] to continue increasing my pay.”

Interest in and demand for equity-based compensation is expected to rise as competition for qualified executives remains stiff and a new generation of talent assumes the top spot, says J. Scott Petty, a partner at executive search firm Chartwell Partners. He says community bank boards should use it as a retention tool.

“In general, more and more CEOs want equity as a part of their compensation package,” he says. “It’s the ultimate alignment of the goals of the board and how the CEO is going to achieve those goals.”

Succession planning at First National Bank of Kentucky changed President and CEO Gregory Goff’s perspective on equity incentive compensation. He plans to retire soon from the Carrollton, Kentucky-based bank, which has $124.5 million in assets, and says he wishes he had opportunities to accumulate equity throughout his career.

“It’s one area of the bank where I didn’t push much—I did my job and went home,” he says. “I ran it like I owned all of it. But now I have no reason to stay here.”

He says the board of directors looked at different incentive compensation structures several times, but could never get comfortable with the dilution from awarding equity or alternatives like bank-owned life insurance. He says the board discussed adding him as a director after he retires, but his lack of equity makes him less interested in a seat.

When Jeffrey Rose interviewed with the board at Davenport, Iowa-based American Bank & Trust in 2016, he told them he wanted to make a bet on himself. Rose says he had been paid a salary and a bonus for turning around banks before, and it “wasn’t enough.” As president and CEO of American Bank & Trust, he hoped to capture some of the upside he created as he helped turn the bank around.

At the $366.2 million asset bank, Rose has the option to purchase a set number of shares each year at a predetermined price. The program is “very simple, very clean,” and the shares fully vest after he purchases them.

American Bank & Trust is taking the equity compensation philosophy one step further, having recently decided to compensate the board with stock instead of cash, too. Rose says the decision generated extensive discussion, but will help long-time directors become more invested in the bank and serve as a positive signal to local shareholders.

It’s tempting for a board to shy away from granting equity to executives—especially if the bank is closely held—but the benefits from doing so can outweigh the costs.

2019 Survey Results: CEO and Board Pay Trends

Today, more banks are tying their chief executive officers’ pay to performance indicators, as indicated by 80 percent of the directors and executives responding to Bank Director’s 2019 Compensation Survey, sponsored by Compensation Advisors. That’s up from 75 percent when Bank Director last posed the question, in 2015.

Most, at 59 percent, tie CEO compensation to their strategic plan or corporate goals.

But the metrics banks prefer vary according to their structure. Public banks are more apt to tie pay to performance—just 8 percent indicate they don’t do so—and tend to favor goals established in the strategic plan (72 percent), as well as metrics such as return on assets (58 percent), return on equity (53 percent) and efficiency (40 percent).

Among private banks, net income is the preferred metric, at 55 percent. Twenty-seven percent of respondents in this group say CEO compensation is not tied to performance.

The survey was conducted in April 2019, and includes the perspectives of more than 300 bank directors and executives—including chief executives and human resources officers—as well as data obtained from the proxy statements of more than 100 publicly traded banks.

It includes details about current CEO and director compensation packages—in the aggregate, and by asset size and ownership structure. The survey also focuses on succession planning and board refreshment.

Respondents indicate that their CEOs all received a salary in fiscal year 2018, at a median of $325,000; the median total compensation was $515,728. Paying a cash incentive (78 percent), and offering benefits and perks (75 percent) are also common forms of compensation throughout the industry. Less common are nonqualified deferred compensation or retirement benefits (49 percent) and equity grants (47 percent). However, payment of equity differs broadly based on the ownership of the bank: Almost three-quarters of respondents from public banks say their CEO received an equity grant last year.

Additional Findings

  • When asked how compensation for the CEO could be improved, 36 percent point to offering non-equity, long-term incentive compensation. Twenty-three percent believe the bank should offer equity at greater levels, and 21 percent say they should offer some form of ownership in the bank. Twenty-two percent believe the bank should pay a higher salary to the CEO.
  • The median age of a bank CEO is 58. Seventy percent are baby boomers, between the ages of 55 and 73.
  • Seventy-two percent believe the current CEO will remain at their bank for at least the next two years.
  • Twenty-one percent believe it’s time for their CEO to announce his or her retirement.
  • Thirty-one percent say their bank has designated a successor for the CEO. One-quarter have identified potential successors.
  • Nearly one-third indicate their board conducts an annual evaluation.
  • Forty-one percent have a mandatory retirement policy in place for directors. The median retirement age is 75—an increase from 72, as reported three years ago.
  • Forty-seven percent indicate their board is working to recruit younger directors. The median age of the youngest director serving on responding boards is 48.
  • Seventy-two percent say their directors receive a board meeting fee, at a median of $900 per meeting. Sixty-nine percent pay an annual cash retainer, at a median of $20,000.
  • Forty-three percent say that tying compensation to performance is a top compensation challenge facing their institution, followed by managing compensation and benefit costs (37 percent) and recruiting commercial lenders (36 percent).

To view the full results of the survey, click here.

What Your Compensation Committee Calendar Should Look Like


compensation-3-12-19.pngA goal-oriented calendar can be the difference between a productive year and a nonproductive one for compensation committees.

Planning for the year goes beyond scheduling meetings. Compensation committee chairs should have a thoughtful plan that encompasses the goals of the committee for the year. A detailed and in-depth calendar can help both new chairs and experienced chairs craft a plan for the year that considers the short- and long-term needs of the bank.

This article provides planning tips and a cheat sheet for the core topics that should be on the committee’s annual schedule. Though the cheat sheet is specific to public banks, private banks can use the list as well.

What’s on The Agenda
The old saying goes “what gets written down, gets done.” Having a written document sets a roadmap for the year and provides your committee a timeline to stay on track. You don’t need to reinvent the wheel.

Start with the committee charter, which provides a job description for the committee’s responsibilities. Review the past year’s calendar, agendas and meeting minutes for a head start in creating your annual agenda and stick to it throughout the year.

Identifying key topics at the beginning of the year allows for communication across all stakeholders: members of the committee, your management team, and outside legal and compensation advisors.

Topics should cover both short-term and long-term items. For example, if you are looking to request more shares for your equity plan, this process should start well in advance, and may include updating your equity plan document, modeling ISS and Glass Lewis share guidelines, and redesigning your grant methodology.

Getting your outside advisors involved early can help you avoid last-minute surprises.

Frequency of Meetings
Typically, public banks hold four to six meetings in a year. This allows the committee sufficient time to cover key topics and to review the goals of the committee. In any given year, the agenda may require additional meetings for special events including merger and acquisition activity, creation of new incentive plans and other events.

committee-numbers.png

What (And When) Should Be on The Calendar
Below are key topics that should be on the regular calendar for public banks as well as additional items for consideration any time during the year. The sample covers a typical schedule, however, there is flexibility depending on the subject.

In any given year, items should be evaluated both in terms of the current short-term and the longer term needs of the bank 24 months or more from now.

compensation-calendar.png

Enticing Compensation Strategies In An Active M&A Market


compensation-1-8-18.pngA recent Deloitte study indicates community bank merger and acquisition activity has been on the rise in 2018, though not necessarily at levels predicted by most experts.

A key benefit of a merger or acquisition is the resulting increase in talent for the surviving bank. Conversely, one of the greatest risks to consolidation is the loss of key employees; particularly talented loan officers. To mitigate this risk, many community banks ensure that director and employee benefit offerings are at or above the market.

The plans offered by the acquiring bank should not be perceived as non-competitive by the acquired talent they wish to retain.

Executive and director benefit plans are also part of the cost of consolidation. The latest report by community bank advisory group Vining Sparks highlighted several “hidden” costs of a merger or acquisition, including executive salary continuation plans (SCPs), director retirement agreements, stock options and employment contracts.

Acquiring banks need to understand the change-in-control stipulations outlined in such benefit plan agreements. These may include stay bonuses designed to retain critical staff through the closing of the consolidation, severance pay arrangements and accelerated accrual and payout requirements for certain nonqualified plans.

While retaining local talent after an acquisition is crucial to the acquiring bank, it should also be a consideration for banks who do not want to be acquired. The 2016 Bank Director M&A Survey found that 85 percent of banks sold because of shareholder liquidity, CEO/management succession, or board succession issues. One year later, Bank Director asked banks why they think they might sell in the future, 67 percent noted the same succession issues. Although many banks recognize succession issues as a driver, nearly 20 percent more of the banks who actually sold noted this as the main motivator.

Though it may be a challenge to find young local talent to establish an effective succession plan, banks can attract and retain the future leaders of their institution. Traditional bank deferred compensation plans, such as SERPs or SCPs usually interest the older generation. More creative plans, such as short-term deferrals and synthetic equity, can attract the younger generations.

When properly designed, short-term deferral plans can interest a young potential executive while simultaneously providing the bank with a hook to retain their services. Typically, a bank would identify a handful of potential candidates for the succession group and offer them a bonus that is deferred for a few years, and then pay out in cash. The bank continues to do so in subsequent years, building an account balance of 3-4 years of bonuses. If the employee leaves, they forfeit the bonuses. This strategy provides the employee with more immediate cash incentive, rather than waiting until retirement like traditional plans. It also gives the bank a few years to vet candidates of the successor pool. 

Synthetic Equity, such as Phantom Stock and Stock Appreciation Rights plans, is another approach banks utilize to align the interests of the executive with the success of the bank. Often, younger executives are not shareholders, but these plans are designed to make them feel and act like it. Simply stated, fake shares are awarded to each executive in the plan. These fake shares perform exactly like actual bank stock, giving the executive a stake in the success of the bank, while not diluting any actual ownership or voting rights of current shareholders.

Looking beyond 2018, short-term deferral and synthetic equity plans will certainly be among the more prevalent compensation plan designs in community banks, as the market continues to trend toward performance-based programs that more readily accommodate regulatory guidance. Plans are likely to include claw-back provisions and more deferrals of incentive pay that allow banks to take back all or a portion of incentive earned by an executive if the bank suffered losses, or was subjected to undue risk, as a result of the executive’s actions.

Bank owned life insurance (BOLI) continues to serve as the primary strategy used by community banks for recovering the costs of executive and director compensation plans. Rising employee benefits costs and competitive market pressures continue to challenge banks to explore unique and innovative ways to maintain profitability and growth while not abandoning their fundamentals.

BOLI helps a bank achieve this in two ways: tax-deferred growth of cash value (recorded as annual non-interest income) and non-taxable insurance proceeds paid to the bank at the time of death of the insured officer or director. These features of BOLI create an earning asset for the bank in addition to providing an effective means of informally funding executive or director compensation plans.