Strengthening Customer Engagement



Fintech companies are laser-focused on improving consumer engagement—but there is room for traditional banks to gain ground, according to Craig McLaughlin, president and CEO of Extractable. In this video, he shares three ways banks can strategically approach improving the customer experience at their own institutions.

  • The One Trait That Sets Fintechs Apart
  • Improving the Customer Experience
  • Understanding Digital Strategy

The Next Things To Know About Data


data-3-5-19.pngThere’s one thing in today’s banking industry that is critical to remaining competitive, being innovative, and maintaining compliance and risk levels: data.

This is no longer a surprise for most banks. It’s an issue that comes up often among bank boards and management, but there are still a number of challenges that banks must overcome to be successful in all of those areas.

It has a connection to many of the major decisions boards make, from what third-party partners to join forces with to how it integrates the next landmark technology.


	strategy-3-5-19-tb.pngFive Steps to a Data-Driven Competitive Strategy
Maintaining a competitive advantage for banks today lies in one of its most precious assets: data. Banks have the gold standard of consumer data, and leveraging that information can be the trump card in achieving growth goals.

Getting there, though, requires good governance of data and technology, and then using those elements to craft strategic objectives.

compliance-3-5-19-tb.pngFintechs Can Fend Off Compliance Issues With Data
Fintechs are known to be nimbler than banks for a few reasons, including a limited regulatory framework compared to their bank partners and a smaller set of products or services. But with that relative freedom comes added risk if they don’t comply with broader regulatory requirements. One compliance problem can put a fintech out of business.

But those companies can use data to reduce compliance risk. Here’s how.

risk-3-5-19-tb.pngRisk Management at the Forefront in Fintech Partnerships
Bank regulators have generally kept their distance from interfering in bank-fintech partnerships. Agencies have deferred to the bank’s third-party risk management process, but some regulators have indicated the intent to keep a closer eye on third-party fintech firms.

Here is an overview of what banks should keep in mind when considering and managing the risk associated with these third-party partnerships.

innovation-3-5-19-tb.pngFour Ways To Innovate And Manage Risk, Compliance
There is a careful balance that banks must strike in today’s industry. To remain competitive, they have to innovate, but they also have to remain compliant with regulations, many of which have stood for years, and manage risks that can ebb and flow with economic and technological pressure.

Finding a similar balance between thinking strategically for the future while also remembering what has worked and not worked can also be challenging for financial institutions. Building a checklist around these four ideas can help achieve that balance.

partner-3-5-19-tb.pngHow to Pick The Right Data Partner
Banks are grappling with trying to gain the greatest efficiency through a variety of innovative and technological tools, but often are hampered by the quality of the data they maintain. To make correct and sound decisions, accurate and reliable data is essential.

Partnering with third-party data service providers can help with that effort, but even that requires due diligence. To help with that due diligence, banks should have a checklist of capabilities for those partners.

How Open Banking Changes the Game for Private Banks


technology-2-4-19.pngOpen banking is the most prominent response to the strong push from technology, competition, regulation and customer expectations. This begs the questions, why should a private bank’s open banking strategy be individual? What impact does it have on the IT architecture? How does it improve customer service?

The new “ex-custody 2.0” model provides the answers.

Regulation, competition from digital giants, changing client expectations, the rise of open API technology and next generation scalable infrastructure are the forces unbundling the financial industry’s business model. Open banking, or the shift from a monolithic to a distributed business model, is one strategy for banks to harness these forces and generate value.

Four strategies for private banks
While banks have traditionally played the role of an integrator, offering products to clients through their own channels and IT infrastructure, open banking provides them with more possibilities.

These include being a producer, or offering products through an application programming interface (API) as white-label to other institutions; a distributor that combines innovative products from third-party providers on their platform; or a platform provider that brings third-party products and third-party clients together.

Private banks may adopt a mix of these roles.

Two Areas of Products
The products generated through open banking can be separated into two areas. The first area includes the API data from regulatory requirements such as PSD2 in Europe. These products are dependent on payment account information as well as payment executions over the mandated APIs.

The second area of products is part of the open banking movement and use of APIs in general. The scope of potential products is much wider as they depend on more than just payment account data or payment execution. Many trend products like crowdfunding, event-driven insurance, financial data economy or comparison services are shaped by the open banking movement.

In practice, many products depend on regulatory APIs, but also on data from other sources. This has been developed into a multi-banking product dubbed “ex-custody 2.0.”

Multi-banking – The ex-custody 2.0 model shows how a client’s wealth can look if his bank can aggregate account information and other data. Technology like the automated processing of client statements or enhanced screen scraping allows, upon client consent, to gather and aggregate investment or lending data as well. The client’s full wealth can then be displayed in one place. From the bank’s perspective, what better place can there be than its own online portal? Terms like multi-banking, account aggregation and holistic wealth management have been coined by the market. We want to add another term to those existing ones:

“Ex-custody 2.0.” Ex-custody is not a new term in the industry. It refers to positions of an accounting area not banked by the bank itself, but where the bank takes over administrative custody and reporting tasks for the principal bank. Ex-custody 2.0 for multi-banking is the next step, where the principal bank does not need to compensate the custodian bank for any services. In the case of screen-scraping, it does not necessarily know the other bank.

Contrary to other multi-banking or account aggregation implementations, the ex-custody 2.0 model is not a standalone application or dashboard, but fully integrated into the bank’s core technology and online banking system. Data is sourced from fintech aggregators through APIs and batch files.

Positions are then booked in a separate accounting area before being fed to the online banking system. This allows the bank to offer innovative products to the customer that rely on integration with both a booking and an online system.

New products include:

  • Multi-banking: the service to manage one’s wealth on one portal
  • Automated advice suitability based on all connected positions on the platform
  • Dynamic Lombard lending based on bank and external investments
  • Cross-selling via direct saving suggestions
  • Risk profiling and portfolio monitoring across institutions and borders
  • Balance sweeping across the family wealth or managed trusts and businesses
  • What-if and scenario simulation through big data modules on the platform.

Conclusion
Open banking will change the business model of private banks. It is a great opportunity, but also a great threat to existing business. The opportunities consist mainly of new scalability options for products, new integration possibilities for third-party products and the creation of new products using the data from open banking.

The main threat is the loss of the direct relationship between banks and clients. However, there is no mix of the four strategies that fits every bank’s business model. It is vital for a private bank to define a position according to the four strategies discussed here and to do so in an individual, conscious manner.

Benchmarking Best Practices



Data has never been more important for the banking industry. In this video, Eric Weikart, a partner at Cornerstone Advisors, interviews South State Bank Senior Vice President Jamie Kerr about the bank’s disciplined approach to data and benchmarking. She also explains the importance of incorporating benchmarking into South State’s culture.

  • Developing key metrics
  • Using data daily

The Modern Roadmap To Gold



Today, data helps competitive banks identify key targets and make smarter—and quicker—loan decisions. In this video, Bill Phelan, president of PayNet, explains how data analysis is shifting loan decisioning, and how banks can survive and thrive through the next credit crisis. He also shares his outlook for business lending, and believes that Main Street America is still looking for capital to grow and improve their businesses.

  • Using Data to Make More Profitable Loan Decisions
  • How Credit Risks Analysis is Changing
  • Preparing for the Next Downturn
  • The Outlook for Business Lending

The New Philosophy That’s Catching on With Banks


customer-12-21-18.pngBankers are right to be concerned that Amazon will one day emerge as a competitor in the financial services industry, but that shouldn’t stop banks from stealing a page from the ecommerce company’s playbook.

Banking is a relationships business. For ages, banks have tried to leverage that relationship to grow and maximize shareholder return.

Some of the ways they’ve done so seem antiquated now, like giving away toasters to anyone that opens a checking account. But the underlying logic remains sound.

That’s why many top banks are now starting to think more like Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s chairman and CEO.

In 1997, the year Bezos wrote his first shareholder letter, he cycled through the usual subjects, boasting about growth and maximizing the return for shareholders. But he also talked about the long game Amazon would play by eschewing even faster growth and profitability by instead focusing “relentlessly” on customers.

We have invested and will continue to invest aggressively to expand and leverage our customer base, brand, and infrastructure as we move to establish an enduring franchise,” he wrote in his inaugural letter.

Why? Because Bezos wanted Amazon to be engrained in people’s lives, far more than just the books they were getting 20-some years ago.

“Because of our emphasis on the long term, we may make decisions and weigh tradeoffs differently than some companies,” Bezos wrote, noting that Amazon’s first and foremost priority would be serving customers, not buckling under pressure from Wall Street.

Two decades later, everything Amazon does is driven by what the “divinely discontent” customer wants, which they learn through data collection and analysis. And as a result, Amazon has become an integral part of many consumers’ lives.

“I sense that the same customer empowerment phenomenon is happening broadly across everything we do at Amazon and most other industries as well. You cannot rest on your laurels in this world. Customers won’t have it,” Bezos wrote two decades later in his 2018 shareholder letter.

It’s this relentless, single-minded drive to satisfy customers that banks are beginning to adopt, especially when it comes to serving customers over digital distribution channels.

Many banks have modernized their digital offerings to attract digitally savvy customers. An ancillary benefit is that the interactions conducted over these channels generate immense amounts of valuable data. It’s be effectively using this data that banks can build out an Amazon-like experience.

Brian Moynihan, CEO of Bank of America, recently explained to Bank Director the value of that data, and also how the $2 trillion bank can leverage it to improve customers’ experience: “We know that customer better than everybody else, because we’re seeing everything they do.”

Another bank doing this is Citizens Bank, a New England-based bank with $155 billion in assets. Citizens CEO Bruce Van Saun talked his focus on customers at the Wharton Leadership Conference this summer.

This focus is behind the bank’s decision to launch its digital offshoot, Citizens Access. It has also informed how they think and obsess over—what else—data. Van Saun said it allows them to leverage it in “moments of truth” for customers that the bank knows better than anyone.

“Citizens is doing this through an intense focus on ‘customer journeys’ – transforming the way we engage with customers at critical moments so that they are compelling, differentiated, personalized and highly user-friendly. This process starts with putting the customer – not the organization – at the center.”

Sounds an awful lot like Bezos and Moynihan. It also sounds a lot like “The Law of The Customer,” a theory discussed in Stephen Denning’s book, “The Age of Agile.”

Denning discusses a “Copernican revolution” of management that puts the customer at the center, rather than the firm. Nicolas Copernicus, of course, was first with the theory the Earth revolved around the Sun, not vice versa, a blasphemous idea in the 16th century.

What that means is delivering things like delight, enthusiasm and passion instead of products or services.

This requires a cultural transformation at organizations, Denning argues, and especially at banks that have long been driven by traditional metrics.

That is where not just the CEO, but the entire C-suite, comes in.

“If the drive to delight customers comes from the CEO alone, or from the bottom alone, the firm is lost,” Denning writes.

Most banks don’t have the manpower or capital to invest in tech capabilities like the biggest banks, but many are now realizing they do have the most prized collection of data about their customers.

That data can be leveraged, and it’s data that would make Bezos even more obsessed than he already is about customers.

How Data Can Build Trust With Customers


data-12-17-18.pngIn mid-August, driven by a cyberattack against ATMs that withdrew close to $11.5 million, the FBI sent out a warning to financial services companies that their organizations could be targeted. In another bleak headline, an Australian bank lost data on 12 million of its consumers—containing financial records from 2004-14—without disclosing it to customers.

Misuse of customer data is beginning to sound like business as usual to consumers.

Bank directors and senior leaders face a constantly evolving list of risks that can erode trust in their organizations. As we explored in the [first part of this series], these kinds of risk incidents drive other negative impacts, including increased expenses and customer attrition that stall bottom-line growth.

To combat the trend of declining trust, it’s critical that dedicated teams are enabled to address risk and regulatory compliance. However, effective recovery demands the entire organization to restore trust through a holistic risk-mitigation strategy focused on protecting and using customer data in a trustworthy way.

The 2018 Edelman Trust Barometer highlights technology as a key enabler of trust in financial institutions, with fraud protection, use of technology to resolve customer issues, and mobile apps all cited as top drivers. Successfully deploying each of these elements commands a concerted focus on protecting customer data. Little things like requiring a complex password can signal the bank has the best interests of the customer—and the protection of his or her personal information—at heart.

By focusing on building trust through digital experiences and data, bottom-line impacts also will follow. For example, in a Forrester study on customer advocacy, customers of online banks performing well in customer advocacy tend to be more loyal: 80 percent of these customers believed they would choose that bank for their next financial product.
Bank directors and senior leaders can strengthen their bank’s business model, mitigate risk, and build trust through digital elements by empowering cross-functional teams to adhere to the following considerations:

Examine customer expectations. Customers’ digital expectations are relatively brand-agnostic. But it’s not a standalone channel, and how interactions are integrated into a more complex digital experience should be considered when forming a strategy.

Many studies have shown consumers prefer a combination of human and digital touchpoints. To build an effective customer engagement strategy, banks must enable customers in whichever channel they prefer. Doing so builds confidence, and ultimately trust—whether that be transferring funds or setting up a new account.

Mitigate risk by balancing security and design. While security measures have become increasingly important and key to establishing trust, they can also create user experience challenges. With voice-enabled search expected to comprise 50 percent of all internet searches by 2020, consumers will demand comparable capabilities from their banks—all supported by simple, streamlined interfaces. By ensuring that risk management, technology and digital design teams are finding common ground, banks can deliver a more seamless experience and reduce security concerns—giving customers the peace of mind that their finances and identity are protected.

Be a good custodian and user of customer data. Start with building a data management program with governing policies and procedures that support customer trust. Most consumers are on high alert for unapproved uses of their personal information. Banks should only ask for customer data when leadership can articulate where and how it adds value in a transparent way.

To start, banks can look across sub-sector domains like wealth management. Vanguard, one of the top customer advocacy performers in Forrester’s study, uses customer data to offer personalized investment advice to customers via mobile app, while also clearly defining the ways it uses that data on its website. By responsibly and transparently using data, banks can establish customer trust through tailored experiences.

By pairing a holistic data and risk management strategy focused on digital, banks will not only reverse the trend of waning customer trust, but also strengthen a business model equipped to thrive in the heightened risk environment in which retail banks operate today.

This article is the third in a series on building trust in financial services. Read the first two on building customer trust through experience design and creating empowered, more rewarding employee interactions.

Focus On Two Key Areas to Capitalize on Overdrafts


overdraft-10-16-18.pngBy all accounts, the outlook for overdraft programs is encouraging for community banks.

Increasingly more consumers are choosing to access the service as a short-term funding solution, while regulatory burdens are easing. Banks that manage their customers’ overdrafts with outdated programs—those that do not put their account holders’ best interests at the forefront or utilize outdated technology and procedures—cannot capitalize on this real opportunity to improve service and compliance, as well as fee income.

The Overdraft Landscape
According to Moebs Services Inc., an economic-research firm, overdraft revenue increased 3 percent industry wide from 2016 to 2017, the largest increase since 2009, and is on pace to an all-time high above $37 billion by 2020.

One reason for this increase in overdraft fee income is more consumers are making the decision to access the service when funds fall short. Moebs Services reported there were approximately 1.12 billion overdraft transactions in 2016, up from nearly 1.09 billion in 2015. According to a 2017 Wall Street Journal article, these numbers suggest many consumers consider overdraft a safety net—a convenience—for which they are willing to pay a price. Analysts said in the WSJ article that the increase in overdraft revenue should be expected, since rules and regulations have been in place for some time now.

In addition, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau withdrew overdraft rulemaking from the agency’s spring rulemaking agenda in May after having been on the agenda for years, signaling that no new overdraft regulations will be forthcoming.

With this landscape set, how should your bank capitalize on it?

A Data-Driven, Automated Solution
The first place to start is to review your current overdraft procedures and software capabilities to ensure you are using a modern, data-driven solution—one that automatically manages risk and strives to meet customer expectations. Although there are several essential components of such a system, two are listed below.

Intelligent Limit-Setting
Updated automated overdraft programs should enable your bank to set individual overdraft limits that align with an account holder’s ability to repay the overdrawn balance. The software analyzes the key risk variables of your accounts, identifies the accounts that have the highest probability of charge off and calculates individual “intelligent” limits. It then reassesses that ability to repay daily.

Providing these dynamic limits helps to serve customers better than employing fixed overdraft limits (where the same overdraft limit is assigned to every customer of a certain account type) by granting higher overdraft limits to those customers whose ability to repay warrants it, while pulling back on those who have more limited repayment capacity.

Just as important, using intelligent limits addresses the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) 2005 Joint Guidance on Overdraft Protection Programs, which states, “Institutions also should monitor these accounts on an ongoing basis and be able to identify consumers who may represent an undue credit risk to the institution. Overdraft protection programs should be administered and adjusted, as needed, to ensure that credit risk remains in line with expectations.”

Reg. E Outreach
Eight years have passed since most banks conducted a formal outreach program in response to the 2010 Amendment to Regulation E, or Reg. E, which requires affirmative consent from customers for banks to charge an overdraft fee on ATM and one-time debit card transactions. Does your board know the number of customers who did not provide a decision back in 2010 or at a subsequent account opening?

Without consent, banks do not extend overdraft privilege through these channels, which can result in multiple unexplained debit card declines. Customers may not recall making a Reg. E decision or are unaware it is even an option, which leads to confusion and irritation for the customer.

Data-driven overdraft software allows your bank to identify these denied transactions and sort them by a customer’s Reg. E decision. With this knowledge, you can reach out to those customers who have not provided a decision and explain the reason for the denial, offer overdraft alternatives and obtain a Reg. E preference. Customers appreciate this level of communication, which provides assurance your debit card will consistently help them meet their liquidity needs.

Capturing just a few percentage points more Reg. E opt-ins can result in a tangible increase in both interchange and fee income as well. A qualified third-party overdraft provider will offer employee training, best practices and scripts to ensure your Reg. E outreach program is successful and compliant.

Is your bank positioned to capitalize on the opportunity for better service and income that a well-run overdraft program represents? With the right technology and procedures, you can.

Four New Revenue Streams for Banks


revenue-10-10-18.pngCreating a healthy bottom line is the biggest goal for most financial institutions. If your bank can’t consistently turn a profit, you’ll quickly be out of business.

Maintaining a profitable bottom line requires a consistent flow of revenue. This can be difficult, especially for financial institutions that rely on both retail banking and enterprise customers to generate revenue.

Why is that? Because 40 to 60 percent of all retail banking customers are not profitable, according to a report by Zafin. Combined with the fact enterprise customers are consistently asking for a more robust product suite with high-tech payment options, turning a profit becomes difficult. Banks can alleviate the pressure by finding new ways of generating revenue that will improve the organization’s profitability.

Here are four ways you can create new revenue streams:

1. Reloadable Cards
If revenue has stagnated, it may be time to reinvigorate your product offerings. A good place to start for retail customers is reloadable cards. A report published by Allied Market Research, titled, “Prepaid Card Market – Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2014 – 2022” predicts the global market for reloadable cards will reach $3.6 billion in 2022.

The benefits customers receive from reloadable cards are exceptional—fraud protection, no credit risk, and spending limits—and the profits financial institutions can reap are even better.

With reloadable cards, financial institutions can charge customers a variety of fees, including a fee to purchase and use the card, and a fee to withdraw funds for PIN-based transactions. Reloadable cards can also provide depository income.

2. White Labeling
White labeling can be a great way to generate new revenue streams by letting bank treasury departments resell funds disbursement platforms to their business customers. This makes payments more convenient for customers by speeding up and streamlining the process.

By reselling the right platform, banks can gain a competitive advantage by offering multiple emerging payment methods, such as virtual cards and real-time payments, to business customers. These high-tech payment methods are becoming more and more popular, helping financial institutions win new customers and retain established accounts.

3. Mobile Device Payments
The demand for mobile payment capability has been steadily growing since early 2000. Now, with digital natives like Gen Z entering the workforce, financial institutions have an opportunity to create mobile payment strategies that focus on customer satisfaction and retention.

This is a still an emerging space, but one that holds many possibilities for delivering products and services customers want and need. White labeling and reselling a funds disbursement platform, including mobile payment options, can help treasury clients in this area.

4. Improve Data Analytics
While not a revenue stream per se, analyzing data more effectively can help you identify new ways of increasing revenue unique to your business. For instance, if your analytics reveal many of your customers are small businesses struggling with treasury management, consider launching products and services that help.

The more you know about your consumers and the way they interact with your organization, the better equipped you’ll be to address their needs. Advanced customer data analytics will allow you to improve performance and add products in multiple areas of your financial institution, including:

  • Credit revolvers
  • Credit cards
  • Lending programs

Thoroughly analyzing customer data can also improve your ability to target new services and products to customers who want them.

Find New Products and Services that Appeal to Your Customers
Use your data and experiences with current customers to find areas where they’re struggling. Can you step in with a new offer that solves their problems? Options for improvement with existing customer accounts are the best new revenue streams for your financial institutions.

We’ve seen many banks succeed specifically by optimizing fee collections, delivering white-labeled products to improve customer convenience, and taking advantage of emerging payments technology. Use these revenue streams as a starting point, customizing them for what’s right for you and your customers.

What’s At Stake In A Tech-Driven World


technology-10-2-18.pngTechnology is driving a wave of disruption across the entire financial services landscape. Financial services companies are increasingly finding themselves both competing with and working alongside more agile, highly entrepreneurial technology-based entities in a new and evolving ecosystem.

There are a number of global trends creating opportunities for financial services companies:

  • China’s population is growing at about 7 percent annually, roughly the equivalent of creating a country the size of Mexico every year.
  • At the same time, China and other emerging, fast-growing economies are raising many of their people above the poverty line, creating a new class of financial services consumer.
  • In more developed countries, people are retiring later and living longer.

These trends are driving a growing need for financial services. However, the story does not end with demographics and economics. Changes in technology are reshaping the ways these services are being delivered and consumed.

Consumers expect simplicity and mobility. Smartphones provide a wide range of financial services at our fingertips. With the rapid growth in artificial intelligence and machine learning applications, savvy financial services companies are adapting to the new ecosystem of digital service delivery and customer relationship providers. Gone are the days when customers have to visit the local bank branch to get most of the services and products they needed. The shakeup in providers will make for a vastly different landscape for competing financial services organizations in the near future.

While the adoption of blockchain technology is still in its infancy, it will potentially reshape the financial services landscape. Much of the transaction processing, matching, reconciliation and the movement of information between different parties will be a thing of the past. Once regulation has caught up, blockchain, or distributed ledger technology, will become ubiquitous.

Financial services companies need to understand where they fit in this digitally fueled, rapidly evolving environment. They need to decide how to take advantage of digital transformation. Many are starting to use robotic process automation to reduce their costs. But the reality is the spread of automation will soon level the playing field in terms of cost, and these companies will once again need to look for competitive advantage, either in the products and services they offer or the way they can leverage their relationships with customers and partners.

When companies leverage technology and data to achieve their business goals in this new environment, they also introduce new risks. Cybersecurity and data governance are two areas where financial services companies continue to struggle. The safety of an ecosystem will be dependent on its weakest link. For instance, if unauthorized breaches occur in one entrepreneurial technology company with less mature controls, those breaches can put all connected institutions and their customer information at risk. Further, automation can result in decisions based solely on data and algorithms. Without solid data governance, and basic change controls, mistakes can rapidly propagate and spiral before they can be detected, with dramatic consequences for customer trust, regulatory penalty and shareholder value.

Strategically, financial services companies will need to decide if they want to be curators of services from various providers—and focus on developing strong customer relationships—or if they want to provide the best product curated and offered by others. Investing in one of these strategies will be a key to success.