The Key to Upgrading Digital Experiences

The pandemic has accelerated a number of trends and digital roadmaps, momentum that continues today.

Microsoft Corp. Chairman and CEO Satya Nadella put it best when he said “We’ve seen two years’ worth of digital transformation in two months.” In banking, 59% of consumers said the pandemic increased their expectations of their financial institutions’ digital capabilities. How can banks respond?  

A Non-Negotiable Experience
As customers, haven’t we all had an experience that left us confused? Many times it’s something obvious, like a marketing email urging us to download an app that we’ve had downloaded for years and use weekly. Customers expect that when they share their data, they get a better experience. A recent survey of Generation Z consumers reported that nearly 40% give a business only one chance to provide a satisfactory digital experience before moving onto a competitor.

Customers also expect their bank to be a strategic partner in money management, offering relevant services based on the data they have. These experiences can build loyalty by making customers feel taken care of by their financial institutions.

Common Challenges
When it comes to managing and optimizing their customers’ digital experiences, we see banks dealing with a few major issues:

  • Difficulty effectively cross-selling between products.
  • Disparate services where data lives in disconnected silos.
  • The scale of data, often exceeding legacy capabilities.

These challenges, along with many others, stem from the fact that customer data often live in numerous different systems. When data is scattered and siloed, it’s impossible to tie it together to understand customers or create personalized digital experiences that engender loyalty. This is why many banks are turning to customer data platforms (CDP).

Upgrading the Digital Experience
CDPs are powering some of the most cutting edge, customer-centric digital programs across leading financial institutions. An enterprise CDP makes data accessible and useful by bringing disparate data sources together, cleansing the data, and creating a singular view of the customer that can be used across the entire organization. It can become a bank’s single source of truth on customers. Marketing can connect to customers with personalized offers, analytics can explore data to find trends and areas of opportunity, customer service can access relevant information to assist customers, and finance can forecast with customer key performance indicators.

Should you consider a CDP?
Here are a few questions executives should ask to determine if their bank’s current setup is working:

  • Are customer data points and interactions centralized in one location?
  • How much time are analysts spending gathering customer data for reporting?
  • Is marketing able to easily use the same customer data to drive personalization?
  • How confident are teams in the data?
  • Is it easy to bring in a new data source?

If there is hesitation around any of the answers, looking at CDP options could be a really smart idea.

Capabilities to Look for

There are many companies using CDP terminology to describe products that aren’t exactly that. Banks should focus on a few key features when evaluating a CDP.

Speed to value. How long does it take to pull data together for a customer 360 degree view? When will data be ready to serve customers and power initiatives across the organization? The best way to accelerate these timelines is with a CDP that uses artificial intelligence to unify and organize records, which is much faster and more stable than rules-based data unification systems.

Enterprise functionality. A CDP should serve as the single source of truth for the entire organization, with a suite of tools that can accommodate the needs of different teams. Multiple views means teams are only presented with the data they need, with the methods that they prefer: robust SQL query engine for analysts, point-and-click segmentation for less technical users and dashboards for executive visibility.

Flexibility and interoperability. A CDP should work with your bank’s current technology investments, connecting easily to any tools or systems you add in the future. One sign of this is a CDP having many partnerships and easy integrations that can quickly allow you to take action.

You need to trust that a CDP can scale to the enterprise and compliance demands of a bank, accommodating vast stores of data that will only continue to grow.

A critical opportunity
There is unprecedented demand from banking leaders to stand up a CDP as a critical business driver. And no wonder. With so many customers using digital channels and generating more data, banks need to double down on increasing the lifetime value of existing customers while finding ways to attract new customers.

Can Banks Afford to Be Short-Sighted With Real-Time Payments?

The industry’s payments ecosystem is developing rapidly in response to increasing consumer demand for faster, smarter payments.

The need for real-time payments was accelerated by the global pandemic — but most banks are moving far too cautiously to respond to market demand, whether that is P2P, B2B, B2C or other segments. Currently, The Clearing House’s RTP® network is the only available real-time payments platform, while the Federal Reserve’s instant payments service, FedNow℠, is in a pilot phase with plans to launch in 2023. FedNow will equip financial institutions of all sizes with the ability to facilitate secure and efficient real-time payments round the clock.

For most banks, operating on core legacy technology has created a payments infrastructure that is heavy-handed, disjointed, costly and difficult to maintain, with no support for future innovation. Most banks, fearing the cost and effort of modernization, have settled for managing multiple payment networks that connect across disparate systems and require the support of numerous vendors. With the introduction of real-time payments, can these new payment rails afford to be a mere addendum to the already-byzantine payment architecture of banks?

Answering “yes” begets more questions. How resilient will the new offering be on the old infrastructure? Can banks afford to be myopic and treat real-time payments as a postscript? Are short-sighted payment transformations elastic enough to accommodate other innovations, like the Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) that are in the offing?

Preparation starts with an overhauling of payments infrastructure. If banks are to place themselves at a vantage point, with a commanding perspective into the future of payments, they should consider the following as part of the roadmap to payments modernization:

  1. From transactions to experience. Payments are no longer merely functional transactions; they are expected to provide qualitative attributes like experience, speed and intelligence. Retail and business customers increasingly demand frictionless and intuitive real-time payments, requiring banks to refurbish the payment experiences delivered to clients.
  2. The significance of payment data. The ISO20022 data standard for payments is heavier and richer compared to legacy payments data, and is expected to be the global norm for all payments by 2025. Banks are under increasing pressure to comply, with players like SWIFT already migrating to this format and more than 70 countries already using ISO20022. Payment solutions that can create intuitive insights from centralized data stored in ISO20022 format, while also being able to convert, enrich and validate legacy messaging into ISO20022, are essential. Banks can benefit from innovative services like B2B invoices and supply chain finance, as Request for Payment overlay services is a key messaging capability for customers of real-time payments.
  3. Interoperability of payment systems. The interoperability between payment systems will be an imperative, especially with the ecosystem of different payment rails that banks have to support. Interoperable payment rails call for intelligent routing, insulating the payer and payee from the “how” of payment orchestration, and paving the way for more operational efficiency. Operating costs account for more than 68% of bank payment revenues; centralizing the management of multiple payment networks through an interoperable payment hub allows bankers to minimize these costs and improve their bottom lines.
  4. Streamlining payment operations. Work stream silos lead to fragmented, inefficient and redundant payment operations, including duplicated fraud and compliance elements. This is where payment hubs can add value by streamlining payment operations through a single, consolidated operation for all payment types. Payment hubs are a great precursor for subsequent modernization: intelligent payment hubs can handle omnichannel payments, as well as different payment types like ACH, Fedwire, RTP and FedNow in the future. This takes care of the entire payment lifecycle: initiation, authorization, clearing, settlement and returns.
  5. Future-proofing payment systems. Following the path of trendsetters, banks have to equip themselves with future-proof solutions that can adapt to real-time domestic and cross-border payment systems processing multiple currencies. As open-banking trends gain traction, it is important to consider that the winds of change will eventually find payments, too. It is imperative that banks are cloud based and API driven, so they can innovate while being future-ready.

The opportunity cost of not offering real-time payments is becoming more evident for banks, as they wait for their core providers to enable real-time payments. Calls for banks to modernize their payments infrastructure are swelling to a roar; now is the time for banks to define their payments modernization strategy and begin to act.

How Banks Can Beat Big Tech at Its Own Game

For the last decade, headline after headline has predicted the demise of banks at the hands of the tech giants. Why? One word: data.

Finance is — and always has been — a data-dependent business. Providing a commercial loan relies on knowing how likely the would-be borrower is to default, a rudimentary data-processing task that is exactly the expertise that Big Tech has. These companies, which include Amazon.com, Apple, Facebook and Alphabet’s Google, can generate and leverage large-scale, granular and real-time data on their users, and have used this to build the largest and most valuable businesses in the world.

By comparison, many banks still don’t fully appreciate the value of their data, and have yet to generate meaningful financial returns from it. This is because most of their data is siloed and sprawled throughout the organization across customer onboarding, marketing, financial crime and fraud and credit risk. Instead of being regarded as a valuable commodity, data is seen as a potential temptation for hackers and a cost that needs to be managed.

If banks can learn to leverage their data like these technology giants — embracing digital transformation to lend faster, smarter and more to businesses — they can beat Big Tech at its own game. Unlike Big Tech, banks have long-worked in regulated environments that require all participants to follow the same rules. As a result, they figured out how to work collaboratively with regulators at speed and at scale, and established robust processes and governance around areas such as data ethics and privacy. This has helped build consumer trust and burnished relationships.

This proved to be a powerful combination over the last 15 months as Covid-19 forced states and businesses to temporarily shut down. The government turned to banks, not Big Tech, to help support businesses, via initiatives such as the Paycheck Protection Program and the Main Street Lending Program.

West Reading, Pennsylvania-based Customers Bancorp rose to this challenge and leveraged OakNorth’s ON Credit Intelligence Suite to identify which industries in its portfolio were more stressed and which metrics it should use to determine risk profiles. Data helps banks such as Customers identify overlooked market sectors and business types that are good credits, but could be difficult for lenders to take on without the data or analytics to make an informed decision. Embracing technology to leverage data effectively allowed Customers Bancorp to provide over 100,000 loans and become the sixth-most active PPP lender in the US – a substantial feat for a bank with $18.8 billion in assets.

Regulatory know-how, proprietary data sources and specialized services offer ways for banks to compete with — or indeed, collaborate — with Big Tech. This has been demonstrated through partnerships such as Goldman Sachs Group and Apple, and JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Amazon. Leveraging data and digital transformation will empower banks to discover gaps in the market and even attract borrowers which Big Tech is unable to. After all, not every business will be keen on the idea of borrowing from the same company that helps them share goofy photos with their friends.

Data Considerations for Successful Deal Integration

Bank M&A activity is heating up in 2021; already, a number of banks have announced deals this year. Is your bank considering a combination with another institution?

Banks initiate mergers because of synergies between institutions, and to achieve economies of scale along with anticipated cost savings. Acquiring institutions typically intend to leverage the newly acquired customer base, but this can be difficult to execute upon without a data strategy.

Whether your bank is considering are buying or selling, it has never been more important to evaluate whether your data house is in order. Unresolved acquisition data challenges can result in poor customer experiences, inaccurate reporting and significant inefficiency after the merger closes. What causes these types of data challenges?

  • Both institutions possess massive volumes of data and multiple systems, while disparate systems prevent a holistic view of the combined entity. In a merger, the acquirer does not have access to the target’s data until legal close, and data is not consolidated until the core conversion is completed.
  • Systems are often antiquated, and it is difficult to access high-value customer data. Data integrity is often an issue that impedes anticipated synergies that could promote revenue generation.
  • Absence of enterprise knowledge or insight into target’s customer portfolio. This makes it difficult to identify growth opportunities and plan the strategy for the combined institution. It also creates a barrier to pivoting in the event a key relationship manager leaves the institution.

Baltimore-based Howard Bancorp has conducted five successful acquisitions in the last eight years. Steven Poynot, Howard’s CIO, recommends looking internally first and getting your house in order prior to any merger. “If you don’t understand all of the pieces of your bank’s data and portfolio well, how are you going to overlay your information in combination with the other bank’s data for reporting?”

Five solutions to merger data challenges include:

  • Create a data governance strategy before a deal is in the works. Identify the source and location of all pertinent data. Evaluate whether customer data is clean and up to date. Stale customer information such as old land line phone numbers and inaccurate email addresses yield roadblocks for relationship managers attempting to use data effectively. If your bank does identify data issues, implement a clean-up project based on a data governance policy framework. This initiative will benefit all banks, not just those looking to merge.
  • Develop an M&A integration plan that sets expectations and goals. Involve the CIO quickly and identify tools needed for the integration. Make a strategic determination of what data fields need to be integrated for reporting purposes. Acquire tools to allow for enterprise reporting and to highlight sales opportunities. Partner with vendors who understand the specific challenges of the banking industry.
  • Unify Disparate Systems. Prioritize data integration with a seamless transition for customers as the top priority. Plan for mapping and consolidating data along with reporting for the combined institution. Take product and data mapping beyond what is needed for the system mapping required for core integration. Use the information gleaned from the data to support product analytics, risk assessment, business development and cross selling strategies. The goal is to combine and integrate systems quickly to leverage the data as an asset.
  • Discourage Data Silos. Make data available and easily accessible to all who need it to do their jobs. Banking is a relationship business, and relationship managers need current customer relationship information readily available to them.
  • Analyze. Once the data has been consolidated, analyze and leverage it to identify opportunities that will drive revenue.

In a merger, the sooner that data is combined, the earlier decisions can be made from the information. As data silos are removed and data becomes easily accessible across the organization, data becomes an enterprise-wide asset that can be used effectively in the bank’s strategy.

Unlocking the Value of Customers’ Data

A customer data platform is at the heart of the most cutting edge, customer-centric digital programs at leading financial institutions. This platform should clean, connect and share customer data so the business lines that need it most can create distinctive and relevant experiences. Amperity’s Jill Meuzelaar details the four key features banks should look for in a customer data platform, as well as common issues they may encounter when evaluating a current or prospective system.

  • How to Connect Customer Data
  • Incorporating Flexibility for Maximum Functionality
  • Avoiding Common Pitfalls

What Banks Can Learn From Retailers to Grow Loans

If success leaves clues, retail has dropped plenty of golden nuggets to help the banking industry refine its credit application process and increase customer loyalty.

While banks have come a long way with online and mobile features, credit and loan application procedures are still stuck in the early 2000s. Often, the process is unnecessarily bogged down by false pre-approvals and lengthy forms; bank processes drive how customer obtain loans, instead of by their individual preferences.

Savvy lenders have already adopted alternatives that curate an express, white-glove approval process that incorporates customer loyalty. It’s more of a catalog of options available any time the consumer wants or needs something. Companies like Amazon.com and Delta Air Lines don’t work to predict consumer’s every desire; instead, they empower the customer to shop whenever and wherever, and proactively offer them options to pay or finance based on their data. Consumers join loyalty programs, earn points and build profiles with companies; they can then apply for credit online, over the phone, in store — wherever it makes the most sense for them. If they provide the correct information, they typically find out whether they are approved for credit in 60 seconds or less — usually no heavy paperwork to complete, just verbal confirmations and an e-signature. Retailers have given consumers a sense of ease and confidence that endears them to a brand and inspires loyalty.

Banks, on the other hand, seem convinced that customers are monolithic and must be instructed in how to shop for loans. But they have much more consumer data and more lending expertise than retailers; they could go even further than retailers when it comes to extending loan offers and services to customers in a variety of formats.

For instance, a bank should never have to deny a customer’s loan application. Instead, they should have enough data to empower the consumer with personalized access to loans across multiple product lines, which can go further than a pre-approved offer. These guaranteed offers can eliminate the application process and wait time. It gives the consumer insight into their personal buying power, and instant access to loans where and when they need them. The process doesn’t require a lengthy applications or branch visit, and removes the fear of rejection.

What Keeps Banks from Offering Customers a Faster Process?
It’s not a completely failed strategy that banks throw multiple offers at a consumer to see which one sticks. Some consumers will open the direct mail piece, complete the forms online and receive approval for the credit line or loan they have been offered. That’s considered a successful conversion.

Other consumers won’t be so lucky. The quickest way to upset a consumer who needs a line of credit or loan for personal reasons is to send them an offer that they were never qualified to receive. It’s cruel, unjust, wastes the consumer’s time and jeopardizes any loyalty the consumer has for your bank. Your bank already has readily available data to ensure that consumers receive qualified loans — there’s no reason to disappoint a customer or prospect.

Additionally, consumers increasingly reward personalization, and the sense that an institution understands them. A survey from Infogroup found that 44% of consumers are willing to switch to brands that better-personalize marketing communications. And a recent survey from NCR finds that 86% of people would prefer their bank have greater access to their personal data, compared to big tech companies like Amazon.com and Alphabet’s Google. This is up 8%, from 78%, in a similar study in 2018.

Personalizing messages and offers is something retail brands do well; consumers are open to and increasingly expect this from their banks. This is a bank’s best strategy to stay ahead of retailers’ loan products: showing customers how well you know them and deepening those relationships with fast, guaranteed offers.

The U.S. economy is expected to expand more rapidly later this year, through 2023, according to the Federal Reserve. This is a far cry from the doom and gloom projected late last year. Banks looking to capitalize on the growth will have to adopt a more on-demand strategy from their retail brethren. The loyalty from customers will be sweet.

Best Practices to Achieve True Financial Inclusivity

According to the Federal Reserve’s report on the economic well-being of U.S. households in 2019, 6% of American adults were “unbanked” and 16% of U.S. adults make up the “underbanked” segment.

Source: Federal Reserve

With evolving technological advancements and broader access to digital innovations, financial institutions are better equipped to close the gap on financial inclusivity and reach the underserved consumers. But to do so successfully, banks first need to address a few dimensions.

Information asymmetry
Lack of credit bureau information on the so-called “credit invisible” or “thin file” portions of unbanked/underbanked credit application has been a key challenge to accurately assessing credit risk. Banks can successfully address this information asymmetry with Fair Credit Reporting Act compliant augmented data sources, such as telecom, utility or alternative financing data. Moreover, leveraging the deposits and spend behavior can help institutions understand the needs of the underbanked and unbanked better.

Pairing augmented data with artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms can further enhance a bank’s ability to identify low risk, underserved consumers. Algorithms powered by machine learning can identify non-linear patterns, otherwise invisible to decision makers, and enhance their ability to screen applications for creditworthiness. Banks could increase loan approvals easily by 15% to 40% without taking on more risk, enhancing lives and reinforcing their commitment towards the financial inclusion.

Financial Inclusion Scope and Regulation
Like the Community Reinvestment Act, acts of law encourage banks to “help meet the credit needs of the communities in which they operate, including low- and moderate-income (LMI) neighborhoods, consistent with safe and sound banking operations.” While legislations like the CRA provide adequate guidance and framework on providing access to credit to the underserved communities, there is still much to be covered in mandating practices around deposit products.

Banks themselves have a role to play in redefining and broadening the lens through which the customer relationship is viewed. A comprehensive approach to financial inclusion cannot rest alone on the credit or lending relationships. Banks must both assess the overall banking, checking and savings needs of the underbanked and unbanked and provide for simple products catering to those needs.

Simplified Products/Processes
“Keep it simple” has generally been a mantra for success in promoting financial inclusion. A simple checking or savings account with effective check cashing facilities and a clear overdraft fee structure would attract “unbanked” who may have avoided formal banking systems due to their complexities and product configurations. Similarly, customized lending solutions with simplified term/loan requirements for customers promotes the formal credit environment.

Technology advancements in processing speed and availability of digital platforms have paved the way for banks to offer these products at a cost structure and speed that benefits everybody.

The benefits of offering more financially inclusive products cannot be overstated. Surveys indicate that consumers who have banking accounts are more likely to save money and are more financially disciplined.

From a bank’s perspective, a commitment to supporting financial inclusivity supports the entire banking ecosystem. It supports future growth through account acquisition — both from the addition of new customers into the banking system and also among millennial and Gen Z consumers with a demonstrated preference for providers that share their commitment to social responsibility initiatives.

When it comes to successfully executing financial inclusion outreach, community banks are ideally positioned to meet the need — much more so than their larger competitors. While large institutions may take a broader strategy to address financial inclusion, community banks can personalize their offerings to be more relevant to underserved consumers within their own local markets.

The concept of financial inclusion has evolved in recent years. With the technological advancements in the use of alternative data and machine learning algorithms, banks are now positioned to market to and acquire new customers in a way that supports long-term profitability without adding undue risk.

Increasing Customer Engagement to Exceed Expectations

The new normal produced by the pandemic has underpinned the need for change and connection.

One impacted area are the adjustments organizations are making as they rediscover the benefits of connecting with consumers, rather than simply selling them a product. These businesses are on the right track, as one thing is becoming abundantly clear in the wake of Covid-19: This is not the time to solely sell and advertise.

While advertising and selling inevitably play a big role in business operations, companies are often too focused on these two aspects and it doesn’t always pay off. Now is the time to connect, reach and engage with consumers on a deeper level. The coronavirus pandemic and economic fallout has impacted nearly all areas of consumers’ lives, and their interactions and needs from their banks and financial institutions need to change as a result.

Focusing on advertising and selling may work for some organizations, but with growing consumer expectations, this just won’t do for banks. Customers choose banks partially because of their emphasis on customer service and will be annoyed if the institution tries to advertise or sell them a product that doesn’t match their financial needs.

Connection goes beyond having the best catchphrase or the sunniest stock photo. True engagement is driven by identifying customer needs and communicating relevant solutions, peaking their interest and building connections that will last.

Right now, traditional, product-focused promotional efforts and marketing don’t work because people’s daily lives have drastically changed. Their financial situations may have been altered. A more personal approach develops connections and loyalty that will last for years.

It is more important than ever that banks use customer and business intelligence effectively to promote relevant products and services. Some institutions may need to return to their roots and their initial goal: to serve their communities and the people that live in them. This approach may sound simplistic, but it can prove challenging to achieve.

And banks, like their customers, don’t want to merely survive this health crisis, they want to thrive in these unprecedented times. It takes a shift in strategy to do so. “In a matter of weeks, digital and mobile banking technologies went from being a ‘nice to have’ to a ‘must have.’” The pandemic was even the catalyst for tech adoption at some financial institutions. With the help of data-driven communication systems, one-on-one communication is both realistic and accessible. The massive drive for digital solutions allows banks to reassess digital access to products and services. This immediate boost in digital engagement offers a huge opportunity for institutions that are implementing digital marketing plans, perhaps for the first time.

Practically applied, banks need to turn to smart technology to create a clear path to build better customer relationships and return to the longstanding values of one-on-one communication. While this may seem straightforward, using forward-thinking, innovative technology as the way to “get back to their roots” is an approach not previously imagined by many bank executives.

Utilizing a data-driven digital infrastructure allows banks to reach customers personally, uniquely and instantly. Banks need to embrace comprehensive digital outreach to touch people where they are with the services they need most. Customers still need access to financial services, even if they are avoiding branch locations and ATM lines. The solution is simple: Be the bank that communicates what options are easily accessible and available to them. Be the branch that shows that they care. With the help of an intelligent digital experience platform and the right technology, banks can automate the relevant communications, so the right messages reach the right person at the right financial time for them.

The pandemic sparked a much-needed shift: from being overly focused on advertising, selling and pushing products and services to establishing and building better customer relationships, increasing customer engagement as well as gaining consumers’ trust and loyalty for years to come. Returning to your bank’s original mission of serving the community will give you the ability to target consumers at the exact right time in their financial journey – reaching each customer’s specific needs and allowing banks to engage with their customers.

New Research Finds 4 Ways to Improve the Appraisal Experience

Accelerating appraisals has become increasingly important as lenders strive to improve efficiency in today’s high-volume environment.

Appraisals are essential for safe mortgage originations. Covid-19 underlined the potential impact of modernizing appraisal practices, and increased the adoption of digitally enabled appraisal techniques, appraisal and inspection waivers, and collateral analytics.

Banks have numerous opportunities to improve and modernize their appraisal process and provide a better consumer experience, according to recent research sponsored by ServiceLink and its EXOS Technologies division and independently produced by Javelin Strategy & Research. The research highlights several actions that lenders can take to improve their valuation processes, based on the feedback of 1,500 single-family homeowners in March who obtained either a purchase mortgage, refinance mortgage, home equity loan/line of credit for their single-family home, or who sold a single-family home, on or after January 2018.

1. Implement digital mortgage strategies that streamline appraisal workflows. One of the most-compelling opportunities to make appraisals more efficient is at the very onset of the process: scheduling the appointment. Scheduling can be complicated by the number of parties involved in an on-site inspection, including a lender, appraiser, AMC, borrower and real estate agent. Today, two-thirds of consumers schedule their appointments over the phone. This process is inefficient, especially for large lenders and their service providers, and lacks the consistency of digital alternatives.

Lenders that offer digital appraisal scheduling capabilities provide a more-predictable and consistent service experience, and reduce the back-and-forth required to coordinate schedules among appraisers, borrowers, real estate agents and home sellers. Given younger consumers’ tendency to eschew phone calls in favor of digital interactions, it’s essential that the industry embraces multiple channels to communicate, so borrowers can interact with lenders and AMCs on their own terms.

2. Increase transparency in the appraisal process. Even after an appointment is scheduled, consumers typically receive limited details about the appraiser, what to expect during the appointment and how the appraisal factors into the overall mortgage process. For example, 61% of consumers received the appraiser’s contact information before the appointment; while only 20% were provided with the appraiser’s photo and 9% were told what type of car they will drive. Providing borrowers with more information about the appraisal appointment bolsters their confidence; information gaps can contribute to a less-satisfying experience. Nearly 20% of consumers said they were not confident or only somewhat confident about their appointment, while over 30% said the same about the names of the appraiser and AMC.

3. Focus on efficiency. Overall, 38% of consumers said the duration of the overall appraisal process contributed to a longer mortgage origination process; delays among purchase mortgage and home equity borrowers were even higher.

For example, about two-thirds of appraisal appointments required the consumer to wait for the appraiser to arrive within an hours­long window or even an entire day, as opposed to giving the consumer an exact time when the appointment will take place. Given this challenge, lenders and appraisal professionals that offer more-precise appointment scheduling can improve the consumer experiences and streamline the origination process.

4. Implement processes and technology that support innovative approaches to property inspections and valuations. Covid-19 highlighted the opportunity banks have to adopt valuation products that sit between fully automated valuations and traditional appraisals, such as valuation methods that combine third-party market data and consumer-provided photos and video of subject properties. This approach still relies on a human appraiser to analyze market data and subject-property

This concept is gaining traction in the mortgage industry. In the future, it’s conceivable the approach could be expanded with the use of artificial intelligence and virtual reality technologies.

No matter the method an appraiser uses to determine a property’s value, the collateral valuations process is fundamentally an exercise in collecting and analyzing data. Partnering with an innovative AMC allows lenders to take advantage of new techniques for completing this critical market function. You can view the full white paper here.

The Role Analytics Play in Today’s Digital Environment

Banks have an increasing opportunity to employ and leverage analytics as customers continue to seek increased digital engagement. Combining data, analytics, and decision management tools together enriches executive insights, quantifies risk and opportunity, and makes decision‑making repeatable and consistently executed.

Analytics, and the broad, umbrella phrase automated intelligence can be confusing; there are many different subfields of the phrases. AI is the ability of a computer to do tasks that are regularly performed by humans. This includes expert models that take domain knowledge and automate decisions to replicate the decisions the expert would have made, but without human intervention. Machine learning models extract hidden patterns and rules from large datasets, making decisions based purely on the information reflected in the data.

Financial institutions can use this technology to better understand their data, get more value out of the information they already have and make predictions about consumer behaviors based on the data.

For example, having identified the needs of two consumers, digital marketing analytics can identify the consumer with the greater propensity-to-purchase or which consumer has the more-complex needs to determine resources allocation. These consumers may present equal opportunity, or they may vary by a factor or two. It’s also important to employ analytic tools that extend beyond determining probability to recommending actions based on results. For example, a customer could submit necessary credit information that is sufficient for a lender to receive an instant decision recommendation, increasing customer satisfaction by reducing wait time.

While there are countless ways banks can benefit from implementing analytics, there are eight specific areas where analytics has the most impact:

  • Measuring the degree of risk by evaluating credit, customer fraud and attrition;
  • Measuring the likelihood or probability of consumer behaviors and desires;
  • Improving customer engagement by increasing the relevance of engagement content as well as reaching out to customers earlier in the process;
  • Providing insight into the success or failure in the form of marketing, customer and operational key performance indicator;
  • Detecting and measuring opportunity in terms of customer acquisition, revenue expansion and resource/priority allocation;
  • Optimizing pricing;
  • Improving decisions based on credit, campaign, alerts or routing escalation; and
  • Determining intervention or corrective next action to reduce abandonment.

Each of these capabilities has numerous applications. In a digital economy, the entire customer journey and sales cycle becomes digitally concentrated. This includes using personal financial goal planning, market segmentation, customer relationship management data and website digital sensory to detect opportunities based on consumer intent, fulfillment, obtaining customer self‑reported feedback, attrition monitoring and numerous engagement methods like education or offers. Using analytics adds considerable value to each of these processes — it drives some of them completely. Actionable analytics are key. They drive outcomes based on expert models and data analysis, to scale, to a large set of consumers without increasing the need for additional employees.

Looking at actual business cases will underline the benefits of analytics in relation to propensity‑to‑purchase (PTP), email campaigns and website issue detection. When two different customers visit a bank’s website, the bank can use analytics to detect and measure each user’s navigation for probable interest and intent for new products based on time on page, depth of navigation and frequency signals within a given timeframe. If one person visits a general product page and only stays for 15 seconds, that person has a lower PTP than the other visitor who navigates to specific product and pricing information and remains there for 40 seconds.

The bank can route probable leads to either human‑based or automated engagement plans, based on aggregated data, segmentation, product intent, and in the case of an existing customer, current products owned.

A recent college graduate may be interested in debt management solutions, whereas a more-established empty nester may be in the market for wealth management and retirement planning. Based on user preferences and opportunity cost, these customers can be properly engaged with offers, education and helpful tools through email campaigns, texts, third‑party marketing or branch or contact center personnel.

In today’s banking environment, financial institutions must find new ways to increase efficiency, improve business processes and scale to consumer volume. Analytics support financial institutions in forecasting, risk management and sales by providing data points that help them increase performance, predict outcomes and better solve business issues.