Coronavirus Underlines Digital Transformation Urgency

The passage of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act means up to $350 billion in loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration is set to flow to small businesses by the June 30 funding deadline.

Community and regional institutions are, of course, the logical partners for distribution of this capital. But a challenge remains: How will those financial institutions reach out to the market when their lobbies may not be open, and businesses may not be comfortable with face-to-face interactions?

Banks have done little to change the way they interact with their business customers in the digital age. In good times, this lack of transformation allowed large technology companies like Amazon.com, PayPal Holdings and Square to siphon customers away. The current environment complicates efforts for banks that have not already transformed to be responsive to their customers immediate needs.

Customers prioritized convenience — now banks will be forced to. Even prior to social distancing, consumers prioritized speed and convenience, whether it came to new technology or where they banked.

Winning at business banking was always going to require banks to offer business customers a frictionless experience. But the ability to operate business banking functions digitally has taken on new meaning — from defining quality service to becoming a necessity during a pandemic.

Three Critical Points of Friction in Business Banking
Now more than ever, it should be every institution’s goal to make working with businesses as easy as possible, especially when distribution of SBA dollars is at stake.

To meet this moment, banks need to remove three critical friction points from their business banking experience:

  • The Application: Paper applications are long and tedious, and the process is even more difficult for SBA 7(a) loans. To remove friction, institutions need to focus on data and access. They should use available data and technology to pre-fill applications as much as possible, and provide them digitally either for self-service or with banker assistance.
  • The Decisioning: Underwriting loans is a labor-intensive process that can delay decisions for weeks. An influx of Paycheck Protection Program loan applications will only compound the inefficiencies of the underwriting process. Banks need to automate as much of the underwriting and decisioning process as possible, while keeping their risk exposure in mind. It’s critical that banks select companies that allow them to use their own, unique credit policies.
  • The Account Opening: Banks also need to think about long-term relationships with the businesses they serve during this time. That means eliminating common obstacles associated with opening a business deposit account. For example: If a business has already completed a loan application, their bank should have all the information they need for a new account application and shouldn’t ask for it twice. They need to ensure businesses can complete as much of this process remotely as possible.

At Numerated, the sense of urgency we hear from bank leaders is palpable. Our team has been working overtime — remotely — to provide banks with a quick-to-implement CARES Act Lending Automation solution. Banks have been working just as fast to understand the current environment and build strategies that will help them meet their customers’ rapidly shifting needs.

In many ways, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced banks to consider digital transformation as a solution to this problem. Still, many firms have held off for any number of reasons. Institutions that have focused on digital transformation will be the most successful in improving the business banking customer experience and will lead the way during this pandemic as a result.

From Eastern Bank Corp. in Boston that used digital lending to become the No. 1 small to midsized business lender in their competitive market, to First Federal Lakewood, in Lakewood, Ohio, that is using digital experiences to retain and grow strategic relationships, institutions of all sizes have launched new digital capabilities, better positioning them to face what’s ahead.

As the nation’s businesses grapple with this new reality, these financial institutions are examples for others exploring how to serve business customers when they can’t see them face to face. Doing so will require a reimagining of the way we do business banking.

Artificial Intelligence: Exploring What’s Possible

Banks are exploring artificial intelligence to bolster regulatory compliance processes and better understand customers. This technology promises to expand over the next several years, says Sultan Meghji, CEO of Neocova. As AI emerges, it’s vital that bank leaders explore its possibilities. He shares how banks should consider and move forward with these solutions. 

  • Common Uses of AI Today
  • Near-Term Perspective
  • Evaluating & Implementing Solutions

 

One Bank’s Approach to Improving Its Culture

Merriam-Webster defines culture as “the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution or organization.” These attributes are central to a company’s success.

Corporations with strong cultures tend to have financial performance that matches, according to studies that have investigated the relationship. The corporate review website Glassdoor found in 2015 that the companies on its “Best Places to Work” list, as well as Fortune’s “Best Companies to Work For” list, outperformed the S&P 500 from 2009 to 2014 by as much as 122%. In contrast, Glassdoor’s lowest-rated public companies underperformed the broader market over the same period.

Unlike the financial metrics banks rely on to measure their performance, culture is harder to measure and describe in a meaningful way. How can a bank’s leadership team — particularly its board, which operates outside the organization — properly oversee their institution’s cultural health?

“A lot of boards talk about the board being the center of cultural influence within the bank, and that’s absolutely true,” says Jim McAlpin, a partner at the law firm Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner and leader of its banking practice group. As a result, they should “be mindful of the important role [they] serve [in] modeling the culture and forming the culture and overseeing the culture of the institution.”

Winter Haven, Florida-based CenterState Bank Corp., with $17.1 billion in assets, values culture so highly that the board created a culture-focused committee, leveraging its directors’ expertise.

CenterState wants “to create an incredible culture for their employees to enjoy and their customers to enjoy,” says David Salyers, a former Chick-fil-A executive who joined CenterState’s board in 2017. He’s also the author of a book on corporate culture, “Remarkable!: Maximizing Results through Value Creation.”

Salyers knew he could help the bank fulfill this mission. “I want to recreate for others what Truett Cathy created for me,” he says, referring to the founder of Chick-fil-A. “I love to see cultures where people love what they do, they love who they do it with, they love the mission that they’re on, and they love who they’re becoming in the process of accomplishing that mission.”

Few banks have a board-level culture committee. Boston-based Berkshire Hills Bancorp, with $13.2 billion in assets, established a similar corporate responsibility and culture committee in early 2019 to oversee the company’s corporate social responsibility, diversity and inclusion, and other cultural initiatives. Citigroup established its ethics, conduct and culture committee in 2014, which focuses on ethical decision-making and the global bank’s conduct risk management program — not the experience of its various stakeholders.

CenterState’s board culture committee, established in 2018, stands out for its focus on the bank’s values and employees. Among the 14 responsibilities outlined in its charter, the committee is tasked with promoting the bank’s vision and values to its employees, customers and other stakeholders; overseeing talent development, including new hire orientation; advising management on employee engagement initiatives; and monitoring CenterState’s diversity initiatives.  

The committee was Salyers’ suggestion, and he offered to chair it. “I said, ‘What we need to do, if you want to create the kind of culture you’re talking about, [is] we ought to elevate it to a board level. It needs to get top priority,’” he says. “We’re trying to cultivate and develop the things that will take that culture to the next level.”

As a result of the committee’s focus over the past year, CenterState has surveyed staff to understand how to make their lives better. It also created a program to develop employees. These initiatives are having a positive impact on the employee experience at the bank, says Salyers.

Creating a culture committee could be a valuable practice for some boards, particularly for regional banks that are weighing transformative deals, says McAlpin. CenterState has closed 11 transactions since 2011. In January, it announced it will merge with $15.9 billion asset South State Corp., based in Columbia, South Carolina. The merger of equals will create a $34 billion organization.  

“At the board level, there’s a focus on making sure there is a common culture [within] the now very large, combined institution,” says McAlpin, referencing CenterState. “And that’s not easy to accomplish, so the board should be congratulated for that … to form a [culture] committee is a very good step.”

CenterState’s culture committee leverages the passion and expertise of its directors. Both Salyers and fellow director Jody Dreyer, a retired Disney executive, possess strong backgrounds in customer service and employee satisfaction at companies well-regarded for their corporate culture. While this expertise can be found on the boards of Starbucks Corp. and luxury retailer Nordstrom, few bank boards possess these traits.

Focusing on culture and the employee experience from the top down is vital to create loyal customers.

“The best companies know that culture trumps everything else, so they are intentional about crafting engaging and compelling environments,” Salyers wrote in his book. “A company’s culture is its greatest competitive advantage, and it will either multiply a company’s efforts, or divide both its performance and its people.”

Embracing Frictionless Loans by Eliminating Touch Points


lending-9-13-19.pngTo create a meaningful customer relationship, banks should drive to simplify and streamline the operational process to book a loan.

Automated touchpoints are a natural component of the 21st century customer experience. When properly implemented, technology can create a touch-free, self-service model that simplifies the effort required by both customer and bank to complete transactions. One area ripe for technological innovation is the lending process. Banks should consider how they can remove touch points from these operations as a way to better both customer service and resource allocation.

Frictionless loans can move from origination to fulfillment without requiring human intervention, which can help build or enhance relationships with clients. Your institution may already be working on decreasing touches and increasing automation. But as you long as your bank has an area of tactile, not strategic, contact between your staff and your customer, your bank — and customers — will still have friction.

Bankers looking to decrease this friction and make lending a smooth and seamless process for borrowers and originators alike should ask themselves these four questions:

How many human touchpoints does your bank still have in play to originate and fulfill a loan? Many banks allow customers to start a loan application online and manage their payments in the cloud, but what kind of tactile processes persist between that initial application and the payment? Executives should identify how many steps in their lending process require trained staff to help your customers complete that gap. Knowing where those touchpoints are means your digital strategy can address them.

What value can your bank achieve by reducing and ultimately eliminating the number of touches needed to originate a loan? Every touch has the potential to slow a loan through the application process and potentially introduce human error into the flow. But not all touchpoints are created equal.

Bankers should consider the value of digital data collection, or automating credit score and loan criteria review. They may be able to eliminate the manual review of applications, titles and appraisals, among other things. They could also automate compliant document creation and selection. Banks should assess if their technology enablement efforts produce a faster, simpler customer experience, and what areas they can identify for improvement.

Do you have the right technology in place to reduce those touchpoints? Executives should determine if their bank’s origination systems have the capabilities to support the digital strategy and provide the ideal customer experience. Does the bank’s current solution deliver an integrated data workflow, or is it a collection of separate tools that depend on the manual re-entry of data to push loans through the pipeline?

Does your bank have an organizational culture that supports change management? Does your bank typically plan for change, or does it wait to react after change becomes inevitable? Executives should identify what needs to happen today so they can capitalize quickly on opportunity and minimize disruptions to operations.

Siloed functional areas are prone to operational entrenchment, and well-intentioned staff can inadvertently slow or disrupt change adoption. These factors can be difficult to change, but bankers can moderate their influences by cultivating horizontal communication channels that thread organizational disciplines together, support transparency and allow two-way knowledge exchanges.

For banks, a human touch can be one of the most valuable assets. It can help build long lasting and meaningful relationships with clients and enable mutual success over time. This is precisely why banks should reserve it for business activities that have the greatest potential to add value to a client’s experience. Technology can free your bank’s staff from high-risk, low-return tasks that are done more efficiently through automation while increasing their opportunities to interact with customers, understand their challenges and cross-sell products.

Frictionless loan planning should intersect cleanly with your bank’s overall digital strategy. It could also be an opportunity for your bank to scale up planning efforts, to encompass a wider set of business objectives. In either case, the work you do today to identify and eliminate touch points will establish the foundation necessary to extend your bank’s digital reach and offer a competitive customer experience.

Preparing Cards for the Next Era in Payments


credit-card-9-3-19.pngAdvancements in payments technologies have forever changed consumer expectations. More than ever, they demand financial services that stay in step with their busy, mobile lives.

Financial institutions must respond with products and services that deliver convenience, freedom and control. They can stay relevant to cardholders by enabling secure and easy digital transactions through their debit and credit cards. Banks should digitize, utilize, securitize and monetize their card programs to meaningfully meet their customers’ needs.

Digitize
Banks should develop and deploy digital solutions like wallets, alerts and card controls, to provide an integrated, seamless and efficient payments experience. Consumers have an array of choices for their financial services, and they will go where they find the greatest value.

Nonfinancial competitors have proven adept at capturing consumers via embedded payment options that deliver a streamlined experience. Their goals are to gather cardholder information, cross-sell new services and extract a growing share of the payments value chain. Financial institutions can ensure their cards remain top-of-wallet for consumers by developing a digital strategy focused on driving deep cardholder engagement. Digital wallets are the place to start.

The adoption curve for digital wallets follows the path of online banking’s early years, suggesting an impending sharp rise in the use of digital wallets. A majority of the largest retailers now accept contactless payments, according to a 2019 survey from Boston Retail Partners. And one in six U.S. banking consumers reported paying with a digital wallet within the last 30 days, according to a 2018 Fiserv survey. Almost three-fourths of cardholders say paying for purchases is more convenient with tokenized mobile payments, a Mercator Advisory Group survey found.

Financial institutions can deliver significant benefits to consumers and reap measurable returns by leveraging existing and emerging digital tools, such as merchant-based geographic reward offers.

Utilize
Banks need to provide their cardholders with comprehensive information about how digital solutions can meet their expectations and needs. Implementing digital tools, providing a frictionless financial service experience and helping customers understand and use their benefits can empower them to transact in real-time on their devices, including mobile phones, computers and tablets. Banks’ communications programs are important to encourage adoption and use the implemented digital products and services.

Securitize
Banks will have to balance digital innovation with risk mitigation strategies that keep consumers safe and don’t disrupt transactions. Digital payments are highly secure due to tokenization — a process where numerical values replace consumers’ personal information for transaction purposes. Tokenized digital wallet transactions are an important first step toward preventing mobile payments fraud.

Mobile apps that enable cardholders to receive transaction alerts and actively manage card usage also significantly improving card security. Fiserv analysis shows use of a card controls app may reduce signature fraud by up to 53%, while increasing card usage and spending.

Banks need strategies focused on detecting and preventing fraud in real time without impacting card usage and cardholder satisfaction. This can be a significant point of differentiation for card providers. A prudent approach can include implementing predictive analytics and decision-management technology. And because consumers want to be involved in managing and protecting their accounts, they should have the option to create customized transaction alerts and controls. Finally, direct access to experienced risk analysts who work to identify evolving fraud threats can significantly improve overall results.

A recent analysis from the Federal Reserve indicated debit fraud is running at approximately 11.2 basis points, which compares the average value of fraud to total transaction dollars. In comparison, Fiserv debit card clients experience only 5.08 basis points of fraud.

Card issuers balance risk rules that help mitigate fraud against cardholder disruption stemming from falsely-declined transactions. These lost transaction opportunities can reduce revenue and increase reputational risk. An experienced risk mitigation partner can help banks strike the right balance between fraud detection and consumer satisfaction to maximize profitability.

More Engaged Users Are

Based on these average monthly debit transactions: Gray = Low 12.6, Blue = Casual (medium) 18.3, High = High 21.4, Orange = Super (highest) 28.4
Net Promoter Score = Measure of cardholder loyalty and value in institution relationship
Cross-Sold Ration = Percentage of householders with a DDA for longer for longer than six months but open to a new deposit or loan account in the most recent six months
Return on Assets = Percentage of profit related to earnings

Monetize
Banks can turn digital solutions into engines of growth by creating stronger, more lasting consumer relationships. A digital portfolio can be more than just a set of solutions — it can drive significant new revenue and growth opportunities. By delivering secure, frictionless digital services to consumers when and where they need them, banks can maintain their positions as trusted financial service providers. Engaged users are profitable users.

Digitize. Utilize. Securitize. Monetize. Achieving the right combination of innovative products and exceptional consumer experiences will enhance a bank’s card portfolio growth, operational efficiency and market share.

Connecting with Millennials By Going Beyond Traditional Services


technology-8-28-19.pngBanks are at a crossroads.

They have an opportunity to expand beyond traditional financial services, especially with younger customers that are used to top-notch user experiences from large technology companies. This may mean they need to revisit their strategy and approach to dealing with this customer segment, in response to changing consumer tastes.

Banks need to adjust their strategies in order to stay relevant among new competition: Accenture predicts that new business models could impact 80% of existing bank revenues by 2020. Many firms employ a “push” strategy, offering customers pre-determined bundles and services that align more with the institution’s corporate financial goals.

What’s missing, however, is an extensive “pull” strategy, where they take the time to understand their customers’ needs. By doing this, banks can make informed decisions about what to recommend to customers, based on their major consumer life milestones.

Only four in 10 millennials say that they would bundle services with financial institutions. Customers clearly do not feel that banks are putting them first. To re-attract customers, banks need to look at what they are truly willing to pay for — starting with subscription-based services. U.S consumers age 25 to 34 would be interested in paying subscription fees for the financial services they bundle through their bank such as loans, identity protection, checking accounts and more, according to a report from EY. With banks already providing incentives like lower interest rates or other perks to bundle their services, customers are likely to view a subscription of bundled services with a monthly or annual fee as the best value.

Subscription-based services are a model that’s already found success in the technology and lifestyle sector. This approach could increase revenue while re-engaging younger generations in a way that feels personal to them. Banks that decide to offer subscription-based services may be able to significantly improve relationships with their millennial customers.

But in order to gain a deeper understanding of what services millennials desire, banks will need to look at their current customer data. Banks can leverage this data with digital technology and partnerships with companies in sectors such as automotive, education or real estate, to create service offerings that capitalize on life events and ultimately increasing loyalty.

Student loans are one area where financial institutions could apply this approach. If a bank has customers going through medical school, they can offer a loan that doesn’t need to be repaid until after graduation. To take the relationship even further, banks can connect customers who are established medical professionals to those medical students to network and share advice, creating a more personal experience for everyone.

These structured customer interactions will give banks even more data they can use to improve their pull strategy. Banks gain a more holistic view of customers, can expand their menu of services with relevant products and services and improve the customer experience. Embracing a “pull” strategy allows banks to go above and beyond, offering products that foster loyalty with existing customers and drawing new ones in through expanded services. The banks that choose to evolve now will own the market, and demonstrate their value to customers early on.

2019 Survey Results! Here’s How Banks Are Spending Money on Technology

The desire to streamline customers’ experience and improve efficiency is driving bank technology strategies across the industry, as most executives and directors believe their offerings are “adequate,” according to Bank Director’s 2019 Technology Survey, sponsored by CDW.

The survey, conducted in June and July 2019, reflects the views of CEOs, technology executives and independent directors. It seeks to better understand bank strategies, staffing and budgets around technology and innovation, as well as banks’ relationships with legacy core providers and newer vendors.

Seventy-eight percent of survey respondents say that improving the customer experience is a top objective driving their bank’s strategy around the investment, development and implementation of technology. Seventy-two percent say that fueling efficiency is a top objective.

These strategic objectives are driving where banks are investing in technology: 68% say they’re investing in automation in fiscal year 2019, and 67% are investing money to enhance the bank’s digital channels.

Most banks rely on their core provider to advance these goals. The cores are the primary providers for many of the technologies used by banks today, including application programming interfaces (68% say that API technology is provided by the core), business process automation (43%), data aggregation (42%) and peer-to-peer (P2P) payments (47%).

That relationship isn’t stopping many banks from searching for new potential partners; 60% are willing to work with newer fintech startups. The survey finds that the use of alternate providers is gaining ground, in particular when it comes to the cloud (57%), data aggregation (25%) and P2P payments (29%).

Despite the rise of the digital channel, 51% of respondents say the branch is equally important to online and mobile channels when it comes to growing the bank. More than half indicate they’re upgrading branch and ATM technology.

Just 30% say that driving top-line growth fuels their technology strategy, which indicates that most banks see technology as a way to save money and time as opposed to generating revenue.

Key Findings

  • Loyal to the Core. More than half of respondents say their core contract expires within the next five years. Sixty percent say they’re unlikely to switch to a new provider.
  • But Banks Aren’t Satisfied. Just 21% say they’re completely satisfied with their core provider.
  • Technology Pain Points. Sixty percent say their current core provider is slow to provide innovative solutions or upgrades to their bank, and almost half cite difficulty in implementing new solutions. These are major sticking points when 60% rely on their core provider to introduce innovative solutions.
  • It’s All on IT. Almost three-quarters point to the senior technology executive as the individual responsible for identifying, developing and implementing technology solutions. Almost half task a management-level committee to make decisions about technology.
  • Rising Budgets. Forty-five percent say their technology budget has risen between 5% to 10% for FY2019. Almost one-quarter report an increase of more than 15%. Responding banks budgeted a median of $750,000 for FY2019.
  • Where the Money’s Going. In addition to automation, digital enhancements and branch improvements, banks are hiring consultants to supplement in-house expertise (50%), and bringing on additional employees to focus on technology and innovation (43%).
  • Data Gap. Almost half describe their bank’s data analytics capabilities as inadequate.
  • More Expertise Needed. Fifty-three percent say technology is on the agenda at every board meeting — up three points from last year’s survey. Yet, 80% say the board needs to enhance its technology expertise. Forty-three percent say they have a technology expert on the board.
  • Cybersecurity Top of Mind. Protecting the bank from cyberattacks dominates board technology discussions, according to 96% of respondents. Many boards also focus on process improvements (63%) and implementing innovative customer-facing technology (46%).

To view the full results of the survey, click here.

How to Deliver a Full Customer Experience Over Mobile Banking


mobile-8-21-19.pngWith most banking activity taking place on mobile, banks must innovate in order to deliver the full customer experience straight to customers’ fingertips.

With more people using their phones to access banking services, banks cannot afford to miss out on the massive opportunity to go beyond transactions and offer the sales and service customers seek. A Citigroup study found that mobile banking is among the top three most-used applications on a consumers’ phone, increasing 50% from 2017 to 2018.

Many banks still have a siloed mindset, considering in-branch, mobile and online experiences as separate and distinct entities. But their customers don’t differentiate between channels; they view banking as an omni-channel experience.

Their expectations are the same, whether they go to a branch, visit their bank’s webpage at home or open an app on their phone. If they have questions, they expect the ability to ask their bank within the mobile app just as easily as they would in branch. And if they are interested in learning about savings accounts or loan rates, they expect to easily find that information within the mobile banking space.

Banks have long thrived by delivering seamless transactions, competitive and unique products and outstanding service. They have responded to the growing popularity of mobile banking by investing in technology to build out robust transactional experiences for their customers. From mobile deposit to transferring funds to bill pay, the ability to conduct fundamental banking transactions is available to and frequently used by customers.

Where bank mobile apps are lacking, however, is in providing the sales and service that they excel at delivering in their branches to the mobile devices of their customers. This is a huge opportunity many banks are missing. Based on our data, there are about 2,000 opportunities per every 25,000 accounts where a customer expresses an intent to inquire about how to do something or how to adopt a new product that is entirely uncaptured in mobile banking.

With the advent of digital transformation and more activity moving to mobile channels, the sales and service aspects of banking have gradually become more diluted. Banking has become less sales and service oriented and increasingly more transactional.

There is only one direction for banks to go: give consumers what they want and demand. Banks need to offer customers the ability to connect with them on their phone anytime, anywhere, and to receive the same level of sales and service they do at a branch. Mobile banking provides a plethora of opportunities to do just that.

Banks need to do more to provide the same support and service in their mobile channels as they do within their branches. There are three easy ways they can begin to leverage mobile banking to go beyond transactions to deliver sales and service to their customers.

1. Embed a robust help center within mobile banking.
Make finding and accessing digital support a breeze. Embed support content from your website within your mobile banking application to allow customers easy access to help content like resetting passwords and fund transfers. Make sure the most frequently asked questions are answered in a manner that answers the questions, provides additional information and creates a call to action.

2. Utilize chatbot to further engage customers.
Add live chat or an automated chatbot for an additional avenue to engage with your mobile customers. Banks can use chat to suggest relevant content or products and services, help point customers in the right direction and to learn more about their financial goals and needs.

It’s not uncommon for chat usage to double once it is added to mobile banking, which can put a sizeable strain on contact centers. Use support content in the form of a chatbot to allow customers the ability to self-answer common support questions, and offer live chat for more complex questions and issues.

3. Provide clear, concise product information.
Customers no longer consider mobile banking to be purely transactional. They think of it as an extension of a branch, where they’ve come to expect support and sales information. Providing links to your key products within mobile banking can encourage customers to explore your offerings.

When banks fail to go beyond transactions in mobile banking, they miss out on a vast opportunity to provide sales and service through the channel customers are the most present. The consequences of not doing so can result in greater contact center volume, and missed opportunities to increase wallet share.

Five Insights into the Top 25 Bank Search Terms


customer-6-20-19.pngBanks can use customers’ search queries to create a more efficient, optimized user experience.

Most marketers rely on search engine optimization to drive traffic to their website, missing a crucial opportunity to optimize searching on the site itself. But on-site search optimization is a critical component of search and self-service for customers, and is a way that banks can create a better experience for users.

Search engine optimization, or SEO, focuses on attracting new visitors to a website. On-site search optimization addresses the existing and returning traffic base—a bank’s current customers and prospects. This approach helps them find helpful and relevant content once they are on the site, which is as important as getting them to the website or mobile application in the first place.

A growing percentage of customers use digital channels to interact with banks and require intuitive search and easy-to-find support information. Banks will benefit from delivering superior on-site search functionality with actionable support answers on their websites and mobile apps.

Transforming a bank’s website, mobile or online banking applications into a true digital support center involves more than a simple search bar. Search terms and activity can be used to inform the support content strategy, while monitoring customers search queries ensures a bank is providing the most sought-after answers across its digital and mobile channels. This continuous process directly impacts an institution’s customer experience, service levels and operational efficiency.

The top 25 search terms across banking websites in 2019 included:

1. Routing Number 10. Direct Deposit 19. Mobile Deposit
2. Overdraft Protection 11. Rates 20. Login
3. Order Checks 12. Address Change 21. ACH
4. Skip Payment 13. Loan Rates 22. Stop Payment
5. Online Banking 14. Debit Card 23. ATM
6. Wire Transfers 15. Check Card 24. Mortgage
7. Credit Card 16. IRA 25. Bill Pay
8. Open Account 17. CD Rates  
9. Account Number 18. Hours  

Customers’ search patterns in a bank’s digital and mobile channels differ the terms used in a search engine platform such as Google or Bing, according to data from SilverCloud. Searches on banking websites and apps average 1.4 words per search, compared to four on search engine platforms. On Google, people search for “the best checking account for me;” on a banking website, they use broader terms like “online banking.”

Two factors drive this search behavior. First, banking consumers are already on the desired site, so they use more narrow search terms. Second, financial terminology can be confusing and unfamiliar. As a result, customers who lack knowledge of specific banking terms tend to use broader search terms to home in on exactly what they need.

There are five takeaways for banks that are interested in how top search terms can help them grow more efficiently:

Banks need to deliver a better customer experience. Having a strong on-site search engine allows customers to service themselves in a way that is easy, fast and efficient.

Strong search could reduce call center volume. Having robust content, frequently asked questions and support answers allows customers to get answers without needing to contact call center agents.

Provide support as mobile adoption increases. Customers will have more questions as banks introduce more self-service options, like online account opening, mobile deposit and online bill pay. Banks should anticipate this and have support answers in place to facilitate faster adoption.

Create opportunity and invite action through search. Banks can drive deeper customer engagement into various product offerings by writing actionable support answers. For example, the answer for a search query for “routing number” could include information about what customers can do with a routing number, like set up direct deposit or bill pay. This approach can increase the likelihood they take such actions.

Banks can do more with less. The more that customers use self-service digital and mobile channels and find information that addresses their queries, the fewer employees a bank needs to staff customer service centers. Institutions may find they can grow without adding a commensurate number of employees.

Banks should review their digital channels to ensure they are providing support content that addresses the ways customers seek information. Content around general search terms needs to be robust. Executives will need to keep in mind that most search terms require 10 or more custom answers to address the transactional, informational and navigational forms of customer intent.

Five Reasons Behind Mortgage Subservicing’s Continued Popularity


mortgage-6-3-19.pngMortgage subservicing has made significant in-roads among banks, as more institutions decide to outsource the function to strategic partners.

In 1990, virtually no financial institution outsourced their residential mortgage servicing.

By the end of 2018, the Federal Reserve said that $2.47 trillion of the $10.337 trillion, or 24%, of mortgage loans and mortgage servicing rights were subserviced. Less than three decades have passed, but the work required to service a mortgage effectively has completely changed. Five trends have been at work pushing an increasing number of banks to shift to a strategic partner for mortgage subservicing.

  1. Gain strategic flexibility. Servicing operations carry high fixed costs that are cannot adapt quickly when market conditions change. Partnering with a subservicer allows lenders to scale their mortgage portfolio, expand their geographies, add product types and sell to multiple investors as needed. A partnership gives bank management teams the ability to react faster to changing conditions and manage their operations more strategically.
  2. Prioritizes strong compliance. The increasing complexity of the regulatory environment puts tremendous strain on management and servicing teams. This can mean that mortgage businesses are sometimes unable to make strategic adjustments because the bank lacks the regulatory expertise needed. But subservicers can leverage their scale to hire the necessary talent to ensure compliance with all federal, state, municipal and government sponsored entity and agency requirements.
  3. Increased efficiency, yielding better results with better data. Mortgage servicing is a data-intensive endeavor, with information often residing in outdated and siloed systems. Mortgage subservicers can provide a bank management team with all the information they would need to operate their business as effectively and efficiently as possible.
  4. Give borrowers the experience they want. Today’s borrowers expect their mortgage lender to offer comparable experiences across digital channels like mobile, web, virtual and video. But it often does not make sense for banks to build these mortgage-specific technologies themselves, given high costs, a lack of expertise and gaps in standard core banking platforms for specific mortgage functions. Partnering with a mortgage subservicer allows banks to offer modern and relevant digital servicing applications.
  5. Reduced cost. Calculating the cost to service a loan can be a challenging undertaking for a bank due to multiple business units sharing services, misallocated overhead charges and hybrid roles in many servicing operations. These costs can be difficult to calculate, and the expense varies widely based on the type of loans, size of portfolio and the credit quality. A subservicer can help solidify a predictable expense for a bank that is generally more cost efficient compared to operating a full mortgage servicing unit.

The broader economic trends underpinning the growing popularity of mortgage subservicing look to be strengthening, which will only accelerate this trend. Once an operational cost save, mortgage subservicing has transformed into a strategic choice for many banks.