How Bank Executives Can Address Signs of Trouble

As 2021’s “roaring” consumer confidence grinds to a halt, banks everywhere are strategizing about how best to deal with the tumultuous days ahead.

Jack Henry’s annual Strategic Priorities Benchmark Study, released in August 2022, surveyed banks and credit unions in the U.S. and found that many financial institutions share the same four concerns and goals:

1. The Economic Outlook
The economic outlook of some big bank executives is shifting. In June 2022, Bernstein Research hosted its 38th Annual Strategic Decisions Conference where some chief executives leading the largest banks in the U.S., including JPMorgan Chase & Co., Wells Fargo & Co. and Morgan Stanley, talked about the current economic situation. Their assessment was not entirely rosy. As reported by The New York Times, JPMorgan Chase Chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon called the looming economic uncertainty a “hurricane.” How devastating that hurricane will be remains a question.

2. Hiring and Retention
The Jack Henry survey also found 60% of financial institution CEOs are concerned about hiring and retention, but there may be some hope. A 2022 national study, conducted by Alkami Technology and The Center for Generational Kinetics, asked over 1,500 US participants about their futures with financial institutions. Forty percent responded they are likely to consider a career at a regional or community bank or credit union, with significant portion of responses within the Generation Z and millennial segments.

3. Waning Customer Loyalty
The imperative behind investing in additional features and services is a concern about waning customer loyalty. For many millennials and Gen Z bank customers, the concept of having a primary financial institution is not in their DNA. The same study from above found that 64% of that cohort is unsure if their current institution will remain their primary institution in the coming year. The main reason is the ease of digital banking at many competing fintechs.

4. Exploding Services and Payment Trends
Disruptors and new competition are entering the financial services space every day. Whether a service, product or other popular trend, a bank’s account holders and wallet share are being threatened. Here are three trends that bank executives should closely monitor.

  • The subscription economy. Recurring monthly subscriptions are great for businesses and convenient for customers: a win-win. Not so much for banks. The issue for banks is: How are your account holders paying for those subscriptions? If it’s with your debit or credit card, that’s an increased source of revenue. But if they’re paying through an ACH or another credit card, that’s a lost opportunity.
  • Cryptocurrency. Your account holders want education and guidance when it comes to digital assets. Initially, banks didn’t have much to do with crypto. Now, 44% of execs at financial institutions nationwide plan to offer cryptocurrency services by the end of 2022; 60% expect their clients to increase their crypto holdings, according to Arizent Research
  • Buy now, pay later (BNPL). Consumers like BNPL because it allows them to pay over time; oftentimes, they don’t have to go through a qualification process. In this economy, consumers may increasingly use it to finance essential purchases, which could signal future financial trouble and risk for the bank.

The Salve for It All: The Application of Data Insights
Banks need a way to attract and retain younger account holders in order to build a future-proof foundation. The key to dealing with these challenges is having a robust data strategy that works around the clock for your institutions. Banks have more data than ever before at their disposal, but data-driven marketing and strategies remains low in banking overall.

That’s a mistake, especially when it comes to data involving how, when and why account holders are turning to other banks, or where banks leave revenue on the table. Using their own first-party data, banks can understand how their account holders are spending their money to drive strategic business decisions that impact share of wallet, loyalty and growth. It’s also a way to identify trouble before it takes hold.

In these uncertain economic times, the proper understanding and application of data is the most powerful tool banks can use to stay ahead of their competition and meet or exceed account holder expectations.

7 Key Actions for Banks Partnering With Fintechs

A longer version of this article can be read at RSM US LLP.

Many banks are considering acquiring or partnering with existing fintechs to gain access to cutting-edge technologies and remain competitive in the crowded financial services marketplace.

There are many advantages to working with fintech partners to launch newer services and operations, but failing to properly select and manage partners or new acquisitions can have the opposite effect: additional risks, unforeseen exposures and unnecessary costs. Partnership opportunities may be a focus for leadership teams, given the significant growth and investments in the fintech space over the last decade. Consumer adoption is up: 88% of U.S. consumers used a fintech in 2021, up from 58% in 2020, according to Plaid’s 2021 annual report; conventional banks’ market share continues to drop.

Planning is everything when partnering with or acquiring a fintech company. Here are seven key actions and areas of consideration for banks looking for such partnerships.

1. Understand your customers on a deeper level: The first step before considering a fintech partner or acquisition is to understand what your consumers truly want and how they want those services delivered. Companies can pinpoint these needs via surveys, customer focus groups, call centers or discussions and information-gathering with employees.

Organizations should also explore the needs of individuals and entities outside their existing customer bases. Gathering data that helps them learn about their customers’ needs, lifestyle preferences and behaviors can help banks pinpoint the right technology and delivery channel for their situation.

2. Understand leading-edge technological advancements: While fintech partnerships can give a traditional bank access to new cutting-edge technologies, leaders still need to understand these technologies and the solutions. This might involve helping teams gain fluency in topics such as artificial intelligence that can improve credit decisioning, underwriting processes and fraud detection, automation that speeds up service delivery responses and customer onboarding, data analysis and state-of-the-art customer relationship management tools and more.

3. Prepare for culture shock: Fintechs, particularly those in start-up mode, will be used to operating at a different pace and with a different style than typical banks. Fintechs may behave more entrepreneurially, trying many experiments and failing often and fast. This entrepreneurial mindset has implications for how projects are organized, managed, measured, staffed and led.

4. Take a 360-degree view of risk: Fintechs may not have been subject to the same strict compliance as banks, but as soon as they enter a partnership, they must adhere to the same standards, regulations and controls. Any technology-led, third-party partnership comes with the potential for additional risks in areas such as cybersecurity, data privacy, anti-money laundering and myriad other regulatory compliance risks. Banks need to have a solid understanding of the viability and soundness of the fintech they might partner with, as well as the strength and agility of the leadership team. They should also ensure the new relationship has adequate business continuity and disaster recovery plans.

From vendor selections and background checks to mutual security parameters and decisions around where servers will be located, all potential exposures are important for banks to assess. A new fintech relationship could open new avenues for outside threats, information breaches and reputation damage.

5. Don’t underestimate the management lift needed:Acquiring or partnering with a fintech or third-party vendor involves significant management work to meet customer needs, keep implementation costs in line and merge technologies to ensure compatibility between the two organizations.

Employees at each company will likely have different approaches to innovation, which is one of the major benefits of teaming up with a fintech company; your organization can rapidly gain access to cutting-edge technologies and the overall agility of a startup. But management needs to ensure that this union doesn’t inadvertently create heartburn among employees on both sides.

6. Build ownership through clear accountability and responsibility: A fintech partnership requires management and oversight to be effective. Banks should consider the ownership and internal staffing requirements needed to achieve the full value of their investment with a fintech organization.

Don’t underestimate the time and effort needed to develop and deploy these plans. Based on the automation levels of the solution implemented, these resources may need dedicated time on an ongoing basis for the oversight and operations of the solution as well.

7. Stick to a plan:While in a hurry to launch a service, leadership teams may gloss over the whole steps of the plan and critical items may fall off. To combat this, banks should have a robust project plan that aligns with the overall innovation strategy and clear definitions around who is responsible for what. A vendor management program can help with this, along with strategic change management planning.

Balancing the demands of innovation with a thorough and thoughtful approach that considers customer behaviors, risks, resources and plans for new solutions will make fintech partnerships go as smooth as possible. Institutions would do well to incorporate these seven key areas throughout the process of a potential third-party partnership to ensure the maximum return on investment.

6 Tactics to Win Customer Engagement

One topic that’s commonly discussed in financial institution boardrooms is how to serve customers and meet their expectations. This topic is especially pertinent now that consumer expectations are at an all-time high.

Bank consumers want delightful, simple customer experiences like the ones they get from companies like Uber Technologies and Airbnb, and they’re more than willing to walk away from experiences that disappoint. As a result, financial institutions are under immense pressure to engage and retain customers and their deposits. Bankers cannot afford to stand idly by and watch a generation of customers increasingly lean on fintechs for all their financial needs.

Fortunately, your financial institution can take action to win the battle for customer engagement — some are already doing so with initial successes. Incumbents like Bank of America Corp. use financial assistants powered by artificial intelligence to assist customers, and fintechs such as Digit offer an auto savings algorithm to help people meet their financial goals. These efforts and features bring the disparate components of a consumer’s financial life together through:

  • An intense focus on the user experience.
  • Highly personalized experiences.
  • “Do it for me” intelligent features.
  • The right communications at the right time.
  • Intuitively-built and highly engaging user interfaces.

How can your bank offer experiences like these? It comes down to equipping your financial institution with the right set of data and tools.

1. Data Acquisition: Data acquisition is the foundation of customer experience.
The best tools are based on accurate and comprehensive data. The key here is that your bank needs to acquire data sourced not only from your institution, but to also allow customers to aggregate their data into your experience. The result is that you and your customers can see a full financial picture.

2. Data Enrichment: Use data science to make sense of unstructured data.
Once your bank has this data, it’s critical that your institution deploys an enrichment strategy. Advanced data science tactics can make sense of unstructured and unrecognizable transaction data, without needing to add data scientists to bank staff. Transforming these small and seemingly unimportant bits of the user experience can have a huge overall effect.

3. Data Intelligence: Create personalized and timely user experiences from the data.
By consistently looking at transactional data, data intelligence tools can identify different patterns and deliver timely, unique observations and actionable insights to help consumers improve their financial wellbeing. These are the small, but highly personalized user experiences that fintechs have become known for.

4. Data Productization: Provide a user interface with advanced pre-built features.
One of the most difficult things for a bank to pull off is data productization. The right tooling and advanced, pre-built features allow banks to unite data and analysis and encapsulate it into intuitively designed digital experiences. This way, consumers can engage naturally with your bank and receive relevant, personalized products and services they need from you. Digital notifications can be part of your strategy, and many customers opt in to receive them; case in point is that 90% of the customers using a Goals-Based Savings application from Envestnet opt into notifications.

5. AI Automation: Utilize AI to enhance self-service capability.
Wouldn’t it be nice if you could ask someone to cancel a check at anytime? Or type in a question and get the answer on the spot? Tools like AI-powered virtual assistants with an automation layer make it simple for consumers to do all this and more, wherever they are. Financial institutions using the Virtual Financial Assistant from Envestnet have automated up to 87% of contact center requests with a finance domain-specific AI.

6. Trusted Partners: Leverage partner to compete.
Competing with fintechs often means, “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.” But leveraging trusted partners is a tried and true strategy. Your bank’s partner could be a traditional financial institution you’ve pooled assets with to create and embed financial technology deep into your experience. It could be a fintech focused on business-to-business capabilities. Or it could be a partner offering world-class data aggregation as well as analytics and innovative tools to enhance your customer experience.

Fintechs have done a phenomenal job at connecting the disjointed components of consumers’ financial lives through amazing customer experiences. Your financial institution can do the same. By using the right data and tools and partnering up, your bank can deliver the personalized experiences consumers expect, delight and empower them to take control of their finances and future.

5 Ways Banks Can Keep Up With Consumer’s Digital Demands

As technology progresses, more financial institutions will face scrutiny from consumers seeking features powered by advanced digital banking platforms.

Consumers are actively searching for banks that value them by giving them remote, customized experiences. Many banks have seen record growth in digital banking usage in recent years, according to a Deloitte Insights report. While this might create a challenge to many financial institutions, it can also be an opportunity to further build relationships with consumers. Below are five things banks should do to proactively respond to customers’ digital needs in their next stage of growth.

1. Analyze Consumer Data
Gaining real-time insights from consumer data is one way banks can start improving customer experiences. Analyzing data allows banks to see how, when and where consumers are spending their money. This data is a gold mine for creating custom approaches for individuals or recommending products that a consumer could benefit from. This electronic trail of customer information can ultimately lead to more personalized financial strategies, better security features and more accurate insights as to what digital banking features will be needed in the future.

2. Humanize The Digital Experience
Financial Institutions are being given a chance to humanize their digital banking platforms. Banks can build and strengthen relationships with their consumers by customizing their mobile experience — right down to the individual. Listening to feedback and valuing a customer’s experiences can create productive and useful relationships. It is important to take a customer-centric approach, whether in-person or through digital platforms. Financial institutions can use consumer purchase history to create custom reward offerings — like 10% off at their favorite coffee shop or rewards on every purchase — that lay the foundation for a bespoke, valuable experience.

3. Understand Digital Trends
According to Forbes, 95% of executives say they are looking for new ways to engage their customers. Financial institutions that remain complacent and tied to their legacy systems can expect to fall behind their competitors if they do not keep up with advancing digital trends. Consumers increasingly shop around and compare account offerings and benefits; they are choosing customizable, digital solutions. Banks that don’t, or refuse to, keep up with digital trends will lose these relationships. As technology expands, so do the needs of consumers —it is up to banks to keep up with those needs.

4. Utilize Advance Card Features
Technology’s rapid advancement means that the digital features that banks can take advantage of have also advanced. Consumers want features that correspond with their everyday financial management strategies and spending. Virtual cards with state-of-the-art security features are just one of the many digital solutions available to banks. Adjustable settings, like the ability to block and unblock merchants, create family hubs, set spending limits for individuals and family members, are just a few of the ways that banks can differentiate their card programs.

5. Keep Evolving
Many banks use legacy systems that are outdated, expensive and difficult to uproot. This technology strategy holds them back from being on a level playing field with their competitors. However, partnering with fintechs that can integrate with their current systems is one way that banks can keep up with digital trends — without the upfront cost of installing an entirely new system.

According to a FICO study, 70% of U.S. bank customers report that they would be “likely” or “very likely” to open an account at a competing provider if that provider offered services that addressed their unmet needs. Today, consumers do not just prefer digital banking: They expect it. Banks that cannot provide their consumers with customizable digital options are at a disadvantage.

How Engagement, Not Experience, Unlocks Customer Loyalty

In casual conversations, “customer engagement” and “customer experience” are often used interchangeably. But from a customer relationship perspective, they are absolutely not synonymous and it’s critical to understand the differences. Here’s how we define them:

Customer experience (CX) is the perception of an individual interaction, or set of interactions, delivered across various touch points via different channels. The customer interprets the experience as a “moment in time” feeling, based on the channel and that specific, or set of specific, interactions. A visit to an ATM is a customer experience, as is the wait time in a branch lobby on a Saturday morning or the experience of signing up for online banking.

Customer engagement, on the other hand, is the sum of all interactions that a customer has throughout their financial lifecycle: direct, indirect, online and offline interactions, face-to-face meetings, online account opening and financial consulting. Engagement with a customer over time and repeatedly through dozens of interactions should ideally build trust, loyalty and confidence. It should ultimately lead to a greater investment of the customers’ money in the bank’s product and service offerings.

Why the Difference Matters
As customers demanded and used self-service and digital banking capabilities, bank executives focused on the user experience (UX); however, that is merely a subset of CX and a poor substitute for actual customer engagement. Moreover, the promise of digital-first often doesn’t meet adoption and usage goals, worsening the customer experiences while underutilizing the technology. The addition of digital-first channels can also cause confusion, frustration and dead-ends — resulting in an even worse CX than before.

Take for example the experience of using an ATM. If the ATM is not operational, this singular transaction — occurring at one specific point in time — is unsatisfactory. The customer is unable to fulfill their transaction. However, it is doubtful that after this one experience the customer will move their accounts to another institution. But if these negative experiences compound — if the customer encounters multiple instances in which they are unable to complete their desired transactions, cannot reach the appropriate representative when additional assistance and expertise is needed or is not provided with the most up-to-date information to quickly resolve the issue — they are going to be more willing to move to a competitor.

When banks focus on experience, they tend to only look at point interactions in a customer’s journey and make channel-specific investments — missing the big picture of customer engagement. This myopic focus can produce negative outcomes for the institution. Consider the addition of a new loan origination system that produces unsustainable abandonment rates. Or introducing live chat, only to turn it off because the contact center cannot support the additional chat volume and its subsequent doubling of handle times. These are prime examples of how an investment in a one channel, and not the entire engagement experience, can backfire.

While banks often look at point interactions, or a customer’s experiences, to assess operational performance, bank customers themselves judge their bank based on the entire engagement. Engagement spans all customer interactions and touch points, from self-service to the employee-assisted and hyper personalized. Now is the time for bankers to consider things from the customers’ perspectives.

Instead, banks should prioritize engagement as being critical to their long-term success with customers. Great things happen when banks engage with their customers. Engagement strengthens emotional, ongoing banking relationships and fosters better individual customer experiences over account holders’ full financial lifecycle.

Engagement enables revenue growth, as new customers open accounts and existing consumers expand their relationship. Banks can also experience increased productivity and efficiency as each interaction yields better results. Improving customer engagement will naturally increase the satisfaction of individual customer experiences as well.

The distinction between customer engagement and customer experience is central to the concept of relationship banking. Rather than providing services that aim to simply fulfill customer needs, banks must consider a more holistic customer engagement strategy that connects individual experiences into a larger partnership — one that delights account holders and inspires long-term loyalty with each interaction.

Demonstrating Empathy Through Technology

Many banks are still trying to determine which consumer preferences and behavior changes are permanent, given the shifts that have occurred over the past 24 months.

During this time period, I’ve spoken with hundreds of bankers and the prevalent theme emerged: The need to respond to customers in a timely fashion, and assurance that there is go-forward alignment with the right business model.

At this point, institutions should consider further exploring ways to refresh customer experience or tackle questions about feasibility, with a focus on defining the strategy for a more competitive customer experience and acquisition structure in today’s digital economy. A strategy that successfully addresses customer needs depends on the ability to project empathy. Executing this in an omni-delivery ecosystem requires financial institutions to effectively listen to their customers’ needs and respond with information or options that are relevant and timely.

There are solutions that financial institutions can leverage today to demonstrate empathy through a listen-respond model. This involves embedding “listening posts” within six functional areas including:

  1. Website sensory: Detecting and interpreting customer needs based on digital behavior. Based on this insight, banks can quantify a customer’s intent and propensity-to-purchase and apply decisioning to trigger the “best” engagement, which could include digital advertising, lead capture or engagement campaign deployment through digital or human channels.
  2. Customer engagement responses: Applying analytics and decisioning to quantify and respond appropriately to customer interaction with campaigns. Desired responses include launching a survey, clicking a link to complete a fulfillment or accepting an invitation for other services that offered by the institution.
  3. Personal financial planner: Obtaining self-disclosed information related to customer needs through unique personal financial planning tools. With goal-centric solutions, the customer selects primary and secondary goals that could include meeting monthly expenses, housing, transportation, education or retirement. The user enters financial information such as income, expenses, assets and debt. By listening to customer goals and financial position, the solution can identify segmentation, quantify customer value index and calculate goal achievability.
  4. Omni-channel fulfillment: Tracking fulfillment attempts and automatically deploying abandonment retargeting campaigns to increase conversions. During the fulfillment process, listening posts can detect customer progress through the application. Through fulfillment completion, a bank can use a decision engine to select an appropriate onboarding engagement plan based on the product selected and any additional anticipated needs.
  5. Staff interaction: Quantifying and monitoring customer satisfaction and attrition risk scores related to personal engagement. Branch and contact center staff listen physically, but they also contribute to digital listening. For example, missed service-level agreements and customer complaints contribute negatively to customer experience and impact predictive attrition risk, triggering customer action. Banker-assisted fulfillment, followed by positive customer survey feedback, can increase satisfaction scores.
  6. Attrition risk: Identifying and quantifying attrition risk factors and proactively and reactively mitigating them. Digital environments can lead to increased customer attrition due to decreased face-to-face engagement.

Solutions can quantify behavior and sentiment indicators based on information that is detected through embedded listening posts. Automated decisioning can respond when thresholds are met and deploy appropriate engagement. Leveraging management insight through key performance indicators and reporting allow banks to monitor, track, execute A/B testing, perform trend analysis and optimize the listening-response model so they can better understand and meet customer needs.

Meeting customer needs requires engagement over time. When banks can understand their customers’ needs through listening and respond with relevant engagement, the customer feels heard, and the institution benefits from increased acquisition, relationship expansion and improved customer experience.

What Does Today’s Community Banker Look Like?

After more than a year of great uncertainty due to the coronavirus pandemic, the biggest driver of change for community banks now will likely come from customer behavior.

The shift towards digital banking that took off during the pandemic is expected to become permanent to some degree. Customers are most likely to use online or mobile channels to transact and they are becoming more involved in fraud prevention, with measures such as two-step verification. They are also performing an increasing number of routine administrative tasks remotely, like activating cards or managing limits. Branches are likely to endure but will need to rethink how to humanize digital delivery: The Financial Brand reports that 81% of bankers believe that banks will seek to differentiate on customer experience rather than products and location.

Digitalization is good news for community banks. It reduces pressure on the branch network and increases opportunities to develop the brand digitally to reach new customers. But it also creates an obligation to deliver a good digital experience that reduces customer effort and friction. In the digital age, customers face less costs of switching banks.

Banks that assume they will be the sole supplier of a customer’s financial services or that a relationship will endure for a lifetime do so at their own risk. President Joseph Biden’s administration is promoting greater competition in the bank space through an executive order asking the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to issue rules that give consumers full control of their financial data, making it easier for customers to switch banks. Several countries have already implemented account switching services that guarantee a safe transfer. How should community banks respond so they are winners, not losers, with these changes?

With their familiar brands, community banks are well positioned for success, but there are things they must do to increase customer engagement and build loyalty. Continuing to invest in digital remains crucial to delivering a digital brand experience that’s aligns with the branch. Such investment will be well rewarded — not only in retaining customers but also attracting new ones, particularly the younger generation of “digital natives” who expect a digital-first approach to banking. The challenge will be migrating the trust that customers have in the branch to the app, offering customers choice while maintaining a similar look and feel.

The branch will continue being a mainstay of community banking. Customers are returning to their branches, but its use is changing and transactions are declining. Customers tend to visit a branch to receive financial advice or to discuss specific financial products, such as loans, mortgages or retirement products. Some banks already acknowledge this shift and are repurposing branches as advice centers, with coffee shops where customers can meet bankers in a relaxed atmosphere. In turn, bankers can go paperless and use tablets to guide the conversation and demonstrate financial tools, using technology augmented by a personal touch.

Community banks can play a crucial role in promoting financial literacy and wellness among the unbanked. As many as 6% of Americans are unbanked and rely on alternative financial services, such as payday loans, pawnshops or check cashing services to take care of their finances. According to a 2019 report by the Federal Reserve, being unbanked costs an individual an average of $3,000 annually. By increasing financial inclusion, community banks can cultivate the customers of tomorrow and benefit the wider community.

Cryptocurrencies are the next stage of the digital revolution and are becoming more mainstream. Although community banks are unlikely to lose many customers in the short term over cryptocurrency functionality, these digital assets appeal to younger customers and may become more widely accepted as a payment type in a decade. Every bank needs a strategy for digital assets.

The shift to digital banking means bank customers expect the same experience they get from non-financial services. Application program interfaces (APIs) have ushered in a new era of collaboration and integration for banks, their partners and customers. APIs empower banks to do more with data to help customers reduce effort, from automating onboarding to access to funds and loans immediately. At a time when community banks and their customers are getting more involved with technology, every bank needs an API strategy that is clearly communicated to all stakeholders, including partners and customers. Although APIs cannot mitigate uncertainty, they do empower a bank to embrace change and harness the power of data. Banks without an APIs strategy should speak to their technology partners and discover how to find out how APIs can boost innovation and increase customer engagement.

The Missing Piece in Customer Engagement Strategies

Usage of appointments in banking has increased significantly since the outbreak of the coronavirus, and is expected to continue in a post-pandemic world.

Appointments increased nearly 50% in the second half of 2020, according to customer usage data, allowing banks to manage limited branch capacity while ensuring the best possible customer service. For example, Middletown, Rhode Island-based BankNewport experienced a month-over-month increase of more than a 466% in appointment volume between March and April of last year, with numbers remaining steady into May 2020. The $2 billion bank noted that these appointments allowed them to prepare for customers, solving their needs efficiently and safely.

Now, nearly a year later, appointment setting is helping banks to meet the transformative and digital-centric needs of their account holders. Online appointments enable any customer or prospective customers to schedule high-value meetings with the right banker who is prepared to speak on a specialized topics. In addition, these appointment holders can choose their preferred meeting channel, such as in-person, phone or virtual. But, how does this translate to customer engagement?

Customer engagement begins when a question or task needs to be done. As the customer or prospect starts searches for an answer on a local bank’s website, banks can use appointment scheduling to ensure that customers have options beyond self-service or automated customer service to connect one-on-one with staff. By optimizing consumer engagement strategies with high-value appointments, banks can increase revenue, boost operational efficiency and improve overall customer satisfaction.

Increase revenue
Today, many branches are faced with the challenge of maximizing revenue opportunities with highly compressed margins. This leads banks to search for more cross-sell opportunities such as opening new accounts, loans or alternative revenue-driving sources.

Appointments help banks maximize these opportunities by connecting customers or prospects with the most knowledgeable service representative to handle sensitive topics, such as account openings or wealth management inquiries. Banks should take full advantage of these crucial meetings because engaged customers are more apt to expand their relationship with an institution when provided with the right resources at a time they’ve scheduled. In fact, TimeTrade SilverCloud data shows that appointment scheduling increases the likelihood that a person will move forward with a loan or deposit by 25% to 40%; customers and employees are better equipped for the meeting’s purpose and have stronger intent to transact.

Boost operational efficiency
Proper branch and contact center staffing levels allows banks to be more efficient without adding to the overall headcount. In the absence of appointment scheduling, employees can be burdened by prolonged rescheduling of meetings and correcting inconsistent information, stemming from unproductive customer interactions and resulting in wasted time.

Appointment scheduling allows employees to prioritize their time to address complicated issues and ensure their full potential is being used during business hours.

This can be further optimized with customer self-service. As more account holders reach a resolution without staff interaction, employees can spend more time with complex customer inquiries. Bank of Oak Ridge saw technology-related questions decrease by 64% after implementating a consumer self-service solution, allowing employees at the Oak Ridge, North Carolina-based bank to expand existing relationships and focus on more critical tasks.

Improve customer satisfaction
Like employees, customers’ time is valuable and their money is personal. When their time is wasted by a low-value interaction, this can greatly impact the overall customer experience. Negative comments about unprepared or ill-informed staff can be detrimental to an institutions’ reputation and consumer trust.

It is paramount that banks route customers to the employee best suited to meet their financial needs and questions. Banks that cultivate a comprehensive customer engagement experience, using online appointment scheduling, will be well equipped to meet customer needs and provide a great experience.

Banking by appointment is a powerful tool in today’s new business environment. Banking competition is increasingly prominent, and going the extra mile to make financial transactions and consultations as easy as possible will be an essential differentiator among institutions. Enabling customers to connect with the right person at their right time, and capturing pertinent customer information at the time of scheduling, allows banks to provide the right answer, resulting in more satisfied customers, better served employees and a healthier bottom line.

A Simple Tweak to Increase Financial Wellness, Engagement

Between the economic uncertainty among U.S. consumers caused by the pandemic and some recent high profile predicaments involving new market entrants, now is the ideal time for bankers to stake their claim as true advocates for their customers’ financial well-being.

Too often, however, financial institutions are guilty of merely engaging in virtue signaling when it comes to their level of commitment in truly supporting their customers. But those institutions that truly focus on providing financial literacy and educational resources to their customers are realizing the benefits of those initiatives, most notably through the increased usage of bank services and increased brand loyalty and “stickiness” within their customer bases.

We know, for example, that just 14% of consumers utilize their bank’s bill pay services, and most of these customers tend to be baby boomers and Generation X. Banks are looking to deepen existing customer relationships, drive usage of available services like bill pay and add younger customers; but the first steps toward developing an impactful financial wellness program don’t have to be complicated. The key is focusing in on an existing need that customers and providing immediate, tangible value to them.

Upwards of 80% of consumers in the U.S. overpay their monthly bills — creating an opportunity for bankers. Each of these consumers are in a position to generate savings simply by renegotiating routine services, canceling recurring subscriptions and monitoring for service outages and added fees. Bills like cable, internet, phone, alarms and gym memberships are usually negotiable, especially since all of these providers typically face healthy degrees of competition within their own markets. Consumers are generally unaware of this, or lack the time needed to do so. By providing services like these to their customers, either directly or through strategic partnerships, bankers can become more active participants in supporting their customers’ financial wellness initiatives, and ultimately become more valued partners and advisors over time.

These incremental savings can add up into meaningful amounts for bank customers and are not difficult to identify. Canceling unwanted subscriptions that began as a free trial offer often yields noticeable results. Pairing subscription management or bill reduction with the transaction makes managing bills and associated costs a seamless, frictionless experience for customers. By providing customers a way to easily unsubscribe with the click of a button within the mobile app, banks can both increase customer engagement within the channel and strengthen customer relationships.

Banks are already ideally positioned to help consumers improve their financial wellness: they possess detailed customer information, transaction data and an established level of trust with their customers. The introduction of new technologies and new digital entrants into the retail banking industry have created an increasingly competitive market — particularly with U.S. consumers embracing a digital-first approach to banking. Banks must be more creative in developing ways to connect with their customers and nurture those relationships. The institutions that go beyond merely identifying themselves as financial wellness providers to actively playing a role in supporting customers stand to benefit the most.

Increasing Customer Engagement to Exceed Expectations

The new normal produced by the pandemic has underpinned the need for change and connection.

One impacted area are the adjustments organizations are making as they rediscover the benefits of connecting with consumers, rather than simply selling them a product. These businesses are on the right track, as one thing is becoming abundantly clear in the wake of Covid-19: This is not the time to solely sell and advertise.

While advertising and selling inevitably play a big role in business operations, companies are often too focused on these two aspects and it doesn’t always pay off. Now is the time to connect, reach and engage with consumers on a deeper level. The coronavirus pandemic and economic fallout has impacted nearly all areas of consumers’ lives, and their interactions and needs from their banks and financial institutions need to change as a result.

Focusing on advertising and selling may work for some organizations, but with growing consumer expectations, this just won’t do for banks. Customers choose banks partially because of their emphasis on customer service and will be annoyed if the institution tries to advertise or sell them a product that doesn’t match their financial needs.

Connection goes beyond having the best catchphrase or the sunniest stock photo. True engagement is driven by identifying customer needs and communicating relevant solutions, peaking their interest and building connections that will last.

Right now, traditional, product-focused promotional efforts and marketing don’t work because people’s daily lives have drastically changed. Their financial situations may have been altered. A more personal approach develops connections and loyalty that will last for years.

It is more important than ever that banks use customer and business intelligence effectively to promote relevant products and services. Some institutions may need to return to their roots and their initial goal: to serve their communities and the people that live in them. This approach may sound simplistic, but it can prove challenging to achieve.

And banks, like their customers, don’t want to merely survive this health crisis, they want to thrive in these unprecedented times. It takes a shift in strategy to do so. “In a matter of weeks, digital and mobile banking technologies went from being a ‘nice to have’ to a ‘must have.’” The pandemic was even the catalyst for tech adoption at some financial institutions. With the help of data-driven communication systems, one-on-one communication is both realistic and accessible. The massive drive for digital solutions allows banks to reassess digital access to products and services. This immediate boost in digital engagement offers a huge opportunity for institutions that are implementing digital marketing plans, perhaps for the first time.

Practically applied, banks need to turn to smart technology to create a clear path to build better customer relationships and return to the longstanding values of one-on-one communication. While this may seem straightforward, using forward-thinking, innovative technology as the way to “get back to their roots” is an approach not previously imagined by many bank executives.

Utilizing a data-driven digital infrastructure allows banks to reach customers personally, uniquely and instantly. Banks need to embrace comprehensive digital outreach to touch people where they are with the services they need most. Customers still need access to financial services, even if they are avoiding branch locations and ATM lines. The solution is simple: Be the bank that communicates what options are easily accessible and available to them. Be the branch that shows that they care. With the help of an intelligent digital experience platform and the right technology, banks can automate the relevant communications, so the right messages reach the right person at the right financial time for them.

The pandemic sparked a much-needed shift: from being overly focused on advertising, selling and pushing products and services to establishing and building better customer relationships, increasing customer engagement as well as gaining consumers’ trust and loyalty for years to come. Returning to your bank’s original mission of serving the community will give you the ability to target consumers at the exact right time in their financial journey – reaching each customer’s specific needs and allowing banks to engage with their customers.