The Year Ahead in Banking Regulation

Although it is difficult to predict whether Congress or the federal banking agencies would be willing to address in a meaningful way any banking issues in an election year, the following are some of the areas to watch for in 2020.

Community Reinvestment Act. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. issued a proposed rule in December 2019 to revise and modernize the Community Reinvestment Act. The rule would change what qualifies for CRA credit, what areas count for CRA purposes, how to measure CRA activity and how to report CRA data. While the analysis of the practical impact on stakeholders is ongoing and could require consideration of facts and circumstances of individual institutions, the proposed rule may warrant particular attention from two groups of stakeholders as it becomes finalized: small banks and de novo applicants.

First, for national and state nonmember banks under $500 million, the proposed rule offers the option of staying with the current CRA regime or opting into the new one. The Federal Reserve Board did not join the OCC and the FDIC in the proposed rule, so CRA changes would not affect state member banks as proposed. As small banks weigh the costs and benefits of opting in, the calculus may be further complicated by political factors beyond the four corners of the rule itself.

Second, a number of changes in the proposed rule could impact deposit insurance applicants seeking de novo bank or ILC charters, including those related to assessment areas and strategic plans.

Brokered Deposits. The FDIC issued a proposed rule in December 2019 to revise brokered deposits regulations. While the proposed rule does not represent a wholesale revamp of the regulatory framework for brokered deposits — which would likely require statutory changes — some of the changes could expand the primary purpose exception in the definition of deposit broker and establish an administrative process for obtaining FDIC determination that the primary purpose exception applies in a particular case. Also, the new administrative process could offer clarity to banks that are unsure about whether to classify certain deposits as brokered.

LIBOR Transition. The London Interbank Offered Rate, a reference rate used throughout the financial system that proved vulnerable to manipulation, may no longer be available after 2021. The U.K.’s Financial Conduct Authority announced in 2017 its intention to no longer compel panel banks to contribute to the determination of LIBOR beyond 2021. In the U.S., the Financial Stability Oversight Council has flagged LIBOR as an issue in its annual Congressional report every year since 2012. Its members stepped up their rhetoric in 2019 to pressure the financial services industry to prepare for transition away from LIBOR to a new reference rate, one of which is the Secured Overnight Financing Rate, or SOFR, that was selected by the Alternative Reference Rates Committee.

For banks in 2020, it is likely that federal bank examiners, whose agency heads are all members of the FSOC, will increasingly incorporate LIBOR preparedness into exams if they have not done so already. In addition, regulators in New York are requiring submission of LIBOR transition plans by March 23, 2020.

The scope of work to effectuate a smooth transition could be significant, depending on the size and complexity of an institution. It ranges from an accurate inventory of all contracts that reference LIBOR to devising a plan and adopting fallback language for different types of obligations (such as bilateral loans, syndicated loans, floating rate notes, derivatives and retail products), not to mention developing strategies to mitigate litigation risk. Despite some concerns about the suitability of SOFR as a LIBOR replacement, including a possible need for a credit spread adjustment as well as developing a term SOFR, which is in progress, LIBOR transition will be an area of regulatory focus in 2020.

Doing an Acquisition? Don’t Forget the CRA Rating


bank-ratings-9-2-15.pngAs we move further away from the recent economic crisis, an increasing number of financial institutions are considering becoming buyers or sellers. It is therefore important that potential acquirers position themselves to be attractive suitors, and sellers demonstrate that they are healthy candidates. Although much of this focus is directed toward an institution’s overall safety and soundness and numerous other factors, one issue that should not be overlooked is its record of meeting the credit needs of its local communities when measured against the requirements of the Community Reinvestment Act.

CRA Primary Factors
There are two relevant factors related to CRA. First, an acquiring institution’s CRA rating can dictate whether a potential deal will receive regulatory approval. Depending on the severity, a potential acquirer with a less than “satisfactory” rating, or even one with more narrow weaknesses in its CRA program, will find it difficult if not impossible to obtain regulatory approval for any transaction until it improves its rating and its internal CRA program. Also, the CRA condition of the seller is significant, and the buyer should determine how that will impact the bank after consummation.

Even an institution with an “outstanding” CRA rating can still face difficulties executing a transaction. The CRA allows individuals and community groups to take an active part in the regulatory application and approval process of a transaction by providing a mechanism for the submission of public comments regarding any perceived CRA compliance weakness or criticism of a party to the transaction. Because the CRA rating is publicly reported, unlike the institution’s other confidential examination ratings, this becomes an easy target. By taking advantage of the publicly available data concerning financial institutions, including CRA ratings, groups located far outside the acquirer’s market area can file comment letters that pass the very low threshold set by regulators to entertain these protests. In some cases, these activist groups have been able to extract significant commitments from acquirers just to get deals done.

Regulatory Approval Process
Most often, these public comments do not, in and of themselves, prevent an otherwise viable transaction from occurring. They can, however, significantly slow down a pending transaction. Under current procedures, written public comments are included as part of the record that the federal agencies review in the evaluation of an application for a transaction. In connection with these public comments, the regulators may make several requests for additional information before ultimately determining whether those public comments will impact their approval of the proposal. This process can take several months, and can even drag on for significantly longer. From deal uncertainty, to the potential that key talent will leave in the wake of a long transition, to the potential for major shifts in the market or rapid economic change, delaying the closing of a transaction while this process unfolds can be quite costly and damaging for the parties involved.

The importance of the CRA comment process to banking M&A has existed for decades, although historically, it generally has been confined to transactions involving very large financial institutions, such as the recent CIT Group-OneWest Bank acquisition. With the current paucity of larger bank transactions, smaller deals are attracting more public scrutiny and suffering significant delays of, in some cases, many months. Discussions and negotiations with the regulators on this issue may be difficult and frustrating. If CRA comments are submitted to regulators for a particular transaction, it is important to quickly develop with legal counsel a clear strategy to address and resolve any issues that have been raised.

Practical Takeaways
To mitigate the CRA risk in M&A transactions, the following are some strategies that an organization should consider, either as a buyer or a seller:

  • Continue to develop a strong CRA program and strategy.
  • Proactively develop or deepen relationships with local community groups.
  • Be extremely careful and consult with legal counsel when deciding whether and how to respond to broad “informational” questionnaires from community groups.
  • Engage with banking regulators early in the transaction process regarding each party’s CRA status, strengths and potential challenges.
  • In the transaction agreement, consider specifically providing for community-based outreach or support programs following the transaction.
  • Provide clear evidence of community support by both parties, pre- and post-transaction, in the deal announcement.
  • Take all protests seriously, and be cognizant that all communication and information may become public.

CRA Comes to Life

WK-CRA-WhitePaper.pngExecutive Summary

The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) requires that every insured depository institution meet the needs of its entire community. It also requires the periodic evaluation of depository institutions’ records in helping meet the credit needs of their communities. Proactively monitoring CRA performance is important for several reasons. The record is taken into account when considering an institution’s application for deposit facilities, meaning it will directly impact any contemplated acquisitions and/or branch openings. Additionally, the record will be regularly examined by the federal agencies that are responsible for supervising depository institutions and a rating will be assigned. Since the results of the exam and the rating are available to the public—customers, competitors and community groups—an institution’s CRA performance can impact its reputation. Banks must understand the characteristics of their assessment area and regularly monitor their performance to ensure the equal credit extension throughout their entire customer base.

This paper will explain the purpose and requirements of CRA and how as a board member, you can provide oversight regarding your institution’s CRA obligation.