The 30 Fastest Growing Salaries for Banks in 2023

There has never been a year for compensation at financial institutions like the one coming in 2023.

BalancedComp is projecting a 5% labor budget increase — a historical high that may be eye-watering for many institutions. We project that the average midpoint movement will move up by 3.5%, which leaves 1.5% left to accomplish two important salary administration goals for institutions:
1. Differentiate for higher performance.
2. Move the pay levels of employees whose salaries are below the market rate.

Below, we’ve compiled the top 30 positions that have seen pay increases that are 150% to 500% faster than the average annual market rate, based on our primary research. Again, this is a historic year for compensation analysis. Based on 2023 projections, these salary figures attempt to correct a scorching labor market and record inflation.

Many executives think of the Great Resignation as mainly impacting non-exempt staff. While this continues to be an issue for recruiting starting, or entry level, positions, the surprising truth is that one out of three of the fastest-growing salaries are from jobs in the top 25% of your salary grade structure. For example, our research indicates that chief risk officer was the fastest-growing salary in 2021; while still on this list, this year it ranked 26th place.

Loan Departments Are Thriving
By comparison, nearly 25% of the fastest-growing salaries at financial institutions were related to the mortgage department. But demand for these roles may cool in the short term, as home buyers wait for interest rates and pricing to return to levels closer to the historical averages in the past five years.

Commercial loan officers and processors join the list, with a salary movement that is 200% faster than the average for the industry. For the second year, the consumer loan processor position has made the list. This position is typically a Grade 6 and requires only a high school degree and approximately one year of experience. Notably, the hottest jobs in the loan department include both production and support positions.

IT Positions Remain Key
Internal IT positions remain in high demand across multiple industries, making it more competitive to recruit new personnel and retain existing employees than ever before. Within this key area of support, there are several positions that appear on the list of fastest-growing salaries:
• Systems administrator
• Network administrator
• Chief information officer
• IT business analyst

Additionally, there are unique and highly technical IT positions that are starting to show up at banks that we have not seen in the past 20 years. These include full stack software developer, scrum master, senior business systems analyst, Salesforce administrator and more.

Clear Labor Market Demands
Workers remain scarce; it will be more critical than ever for banks to address the needs of of their employees. According to a report this year from SHRM, “this is the tightest labor market in the country’s history. Large manufacturers are offering health care and 401(k) on day one, large signing bonuses, and above-market rates, and they’re still coming up short.”

Most employees do not seek out high stress work environments that use subjective performance criteria to measure their contributions. They are no longer accepting lagging wages that fail to ever reach the salary midpoint. They want benefits that match their current lifestyle and work-life balance needs. What will it take to be a successful employer? Is it culture? Wages? Benefits? Remote work? Diversity? Yes to all of the above.

It can be overwhelming for even the most diligent human resource manager to deal with the confluence of strong market forces, regardless of their institution’s strength. Equipping HR managers and executives with the resources they need to succeed will spearhead their workforce to excellence no matter the economic or operating environment. A 2023 labor budget under 5% means HR will spend needless hours recruiting, onboarding and retraining.

According to 2022-2023 BalancedComp Salary & Incentive Survey research, these are the 30 fastest-growing salaries by job title in the financial sector for the upcoming year:

Fastest Moving Jobs Average Percentage Increase
Head of HR 17.8%
IT Business Analysts 17.0%
Mortgage Originators 14.25%
Digital Marketing Specialist 13.40%
Trust Officer 13.02%
Senior Project Manager 11.22%
Head of Mortgages 10.44%
Head of Marketing 9.97%
Chief Info Officer 9.88%
Mortgage Closers 9.05%
Network Administrator 8.72%
Marketing Specialist 8.64%
Help Desk Specialist 8.54%
Credit Analyst II 7.91%
Mortgage Processors 7.90%
Mortgage Loan Officer (base) 7.81%
Commercial Loan Manager 7.77%
Commercial Loan Processor 7.63%
CFO 7.54%
Collector II 7.53%
Mortgage Loan Officer (Commission) 7.23%
Graphic Designer 7.07%
Systems Administrator 7.06%
BSA Analyst 6.88%
Trainer 6.84%
Consumer Loan Processor 6.79%
Market President 6.37%
Mortgage Loan Officer 6.30%
Head of Risk (No. 1 highest in 2021) 6.19%
Collector I 5.93%
Chief Loan Officer 5.59%

Top Priorities for Compensation Committees Today

The compensation landscape in banking is constantly evolving, and compensation committees must evolve with it. We want to highlight three priorities for bank compensation committees today: the rising cost of talent, the uncertain economic environment, and the link between environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues and human capital and compensation.

The Rising Cost of Talent
The always-fierce competition for top banking talent has intensified in recent years, especially in certain pockets like digital, payments and commercial banking. Banks are using a variety of approaches to compete in this market and make their compensation and benefits programs more attractive, including special one-time cash bonuses or equity awards, larger annual or off-cycle salary increases, flexible work arrangements and other enhanced benefits.

In evaluating these alternative approaches, compensation committees must weigh the value each offers to employees compared to the cost to the bank and its shareholders. For example, increasing salaries provides near-term value to employees but results in additional fixed costs. Special equity awards that vest over multiple years provide less near-term value to employees but represent a one-time expense and are more retentive.

We expect the “hot” talent market, combined with inflation, to continue applying upward pressure on compensation. However, the recent rate of increase in compensation levels is untenable over the long-term, particularly in the current uncertain economic environment. Banks will need to optimize other benefits, such as work-life balance and professional development opportunities, to attract and retain top talent.

The Uncertain Economic Outlook
In 2021, many banks had strong earnings as the quicker-than-expected economic recovery allowed them to reverse their loan loss provisions from 2020. As a result, many banks could afford to pay significantly higher incentives for 2021’s performance than they did for 2020’s performance. The performance outlook for 2022 is unclear. Inflation, rising interest rates and macroeconomic uncertainty will impact bank performance results in 2022. Results will likely vary significantly from bank to bank, based on the institution’s business mix and balance sheet makeup.

Compensation committees will need to consider how the push and pull of these factors impact financial results and, as a result, incentive payouts. Some compensation committees may need to consider adjusting payouts to recognize the quantifiable financial impact of unanticipated conditions outside of management’s control, like the Federal Reserve’s aggressive interest rate increases. Banks may find it harder to quantify the financial impact of other economic conditions, like inflation. As a result, many compensation committees may find it more effective to use discretion to align incentive compensation with their overall view of performance.
Bank compensation committees considering using discretion to adjust incentive payouts for 2022 should follow three principles:

1. Be consistent: Apply discretion when macroeconomic factors negatively or positively impact financial results.
2. Align final payouts with performance and profitability.
3. Clearly communicate rationale to participants and shareholders.

Compensation committees at public banks should also be aware of potential criticism from shareholders or proxy advisory firms. The challenge for compensation committees will be balancing these principles with the business need to retain key employees in a tight labor market.

ESG and the Compensation Committee
Bank boards are spending more and more time thinking about their bank’s ESG strategies. The role of many compensation committees has expanded to include oversight of ESG issues related to human capital, such as diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI). Employees, regulators and shareholders are increasingly paying attention to DEI practices and policies of banks. In response, many large banks have announced public objectives for increasing diversity and establishing cultures of equity and inclusion.

In an attempt to motivate action and progress, compensation committees are also considering whether ESG metrics have a place in incentive plans. In recent years, the largest banks have disclosed that they are considering progress against DEI objectives in determining incentive compensation for executives. Most of these banks disclose evaluating DEI on a qualitative basis, as part of a holistic discretionary assessment or as part of an individual or strategic component of the annual incentive plan. Banks considering adopting a DEI metric or other ESG metrics should do so because the metric is a critical part of the business strategy, rather than to “check the box.” Human capital is a critical asset in banking; many banks may find that DEI is an important part of their business strategy. For these banks, including a DEI metric can be a powerful way to signal to employees and shareholders that DEI is a focus for the bank.

The War for Talent in Banking Is Here to Stay

It seems that everywhere in the banking world these days, people want to talk about the war for talent. It’s been the subject of many recent presentations at industry conferences and a regular topic of conversation at nearly every roundtable discussion. It’s called many things — the Great Resignation, the Great Reshuffling, quiet quitters or the Great Realignment — but it all comes down to talent management.

There are a number of reasons why this challenge has landed squarely on the shoulders of banks and organizations across the country. In the U.S., the workforce is now primarily comprised of members of Generation X and millennials, cohorts that are smaller than the baby boomers that preceded them. And while the rising Gen Z workforce will eventually be larger, its members have only recently begun graduating from college and entering the workforce.

Even outside of the pandemic disruptions the economy and banking industry has weathered, it is easy to forget that the unemployment rate in this country was 3.5% in December 2019, shortly before the pandemic shutdowns. This was an unprecedented modern era low, which the economy has once again returned to in recent months. Helping to keep this rate in check is a labor force participation rate that remains below historical norms. Add it all up and the demographic trends do not favor employers for the foreseeable future.

It is also well known that most banks have phased out training programs, which now mostly exist in very large banks or stealthily in select community institutions. One of the factors that may motivate a smaller community bank to sell is their inability to locate, attract or competitively compensate the talented bankers needed to ensure continued survival. With these industry headwinds, how should a bank’s board and CEO respond? Some thoughts:

  • Banks must adapt and offer more competitive compensation, whether this is the base hourly rate needed to compete in competition with Amazon.com and Walmart for entry-level workers, or six-figure salaries for commercial lenders. Bank management teams need to come to terms with the competitive pressures that make it more expensive to attract and retain employees, particularly those in revenue-generating roles. Saving a few thousand dollars by hiring a B-player who does not drive an annuity revenue stream is not a long-term strategy for growing earning assets.
  • There has been plentiful discourse supporting the concept that younger workers need to experience engagement and “feel the love” from their institution. They see a clear career path to stick with the bank. Yet most community institutions lack a strategic human resource leader or talent development team that can focus on building a plan for high potential and high-demand employees. Bank can elevate their HR team or partner with an outside resource to manage this need; failing to demonstrate a true commitment to the assertion that “our people are our most important asset” may, over time, erode the retention of your most important people.
  • Many community banks lack robust incentive compensation programs or long-term retention plans. Tying key players’ performance and retention to long-term financial incentives increases the odds that they will feel valued and remain — or at least make it cost-prohibitive for a rival bank to steal your talent.
  • Lastly, every banker says “our culture is unique.” While this may be true, many community banks can do a better job of communicating that story. Use the home page of your website to amplify successful employee growth stories, rather than just your mortgage or CD rates. Focus on what resonates with next generation workers: Your bank is a technology business that gives back to its communities and cares deeply about its customers. Survey employees to see what benefits matter most to them: perhaps a student loan repayment program or pet insurance will resonate more with some workers than your 401(k) match will.

The underlying economic and demographic trend lines that banks are experiencing are unlikely to shift significantly in the near term, barring another catastrophic event. Given the human capital climate, executives and boards should take a hard look at the bank’s employment brand, talent development initiatives and compensation structures. A strategic reevaluation and fresh look at how you are approaching the talent wars will likely be an investment that pays off in the future.

Research Report: An Uphill Struggle for Talent

The banking business became more expensive last year, as banks were forced to pay up to attract and keep talent. Some of the talent pressures stem from temporary hurdles, such as inflation. But Bank Director’s 2022 Compensation Survey, sponsored by Newcleus Compensation Advisors, points to broader existential challenges the industry faces in cultivating talent for the long term.

Respondents almost unanimously report that their banks raised non-executive pay last year to keep talent, and a majority also raised executive compensation. But higher pay did not necessarily translate into an easier time recruiting, with clear majorities of bankers and directors indicating that it had also become more difficult to attract and retain talent in 2021.

“Banks are just one industry. I don’t think they’re going to be spared what every other industry is experiencing in terms of the shortage of talent and a reluctance, perhaps, of some people to come back,” says Flynt Gallagher, president of Newcleus Compensation Advisors.

Of course, the banking industry has some unique nuances to its particular talent challenges. Competition for commercial bankers has always been stiff, for instance, and it’s likely to intensify as banks look to commercial lending to offset net interest margin compression.

Demand for talent hasn’t been limited to specialty roles; entry-level and branch staff were also difficult to hire and retain in 2021. Some of that, no doubt, was influenced by the pandemic and its ripple effects, but banks also had a lot more competition for even entry-level workers. Job candidates with cash handling experience pretty much had their pick of opportunities, and banks weren’t competing solely with other financial institutions.

“In many of our markets we’re not just competing with banks anymore,” says Eric Thompson, chief human resources officer at San Antonio-based Vantage Bank Texas. “We’re competing with the grocery store that’s now offering $20 an hour.”

To read more about talent challenges and managing compensation expenses, read the white paper.  

To view the survey results, click here.

Modernizing Total Rewards Programs to Attract, Retain Talent

The labor market has shifted dramatically and, in many ways, is more competitive than ever.

Low unemployment and decreasing labor force participation has caused high vacancy rates and increased the time to fill open positions. It’s also pressured employers to increase compensation and enhance their total rewards packages to keep up with changing employee expectations.

These market dynamics mean banks need to review their total rewards package. You may find your bank’s people strategy, and current and future workforce, have evolved beyond the total rewards offerings. You might be investing in benefits and programs that aren’t valuable to employees. Here are three top total rewards trends to consider for your bank.

Compensation
For most companies right now, compensation increases budgets that are already falling short due to rapidly rising inflation. Employers are frustrated that they are stretching budgets and profitability by spending more on wages, without necessarily seeing an increase in their ability to attract and retain. Employees are frustrated that their wage increases aren’t keeping pace with inflation; their personal budgets are stretching, particularly at entry-level positions.

In addition, certain specialized and high demand jobs that can be performed remotely — especially in areas such as technology and cybersecurity — means banks are facing competition from local, national and international companies.

Here are ways to succeed in compensation:

  • Short-term incentive programs: Are there ways to enhance your short-term or annual incentive programs? Currently, nearly 91% of employees receive some sort of variable pay, according to Willis Towers Watson’s 2020 US Annual Incentive Plan Design Survey. Increasing the eligibility to additional groups can make the total compensation package more attractive and competitive, as long as it is clearly communicated and understood. Consider accelerating the payouts to semi-annually or quarterly, so employees receive the value more frequently than once a year.
  • Long-term incentive programs: Traditional long-term incentive plans are simply a compensation arrangement with a delayed timing element. While simple to administer, they can lack flexibility that connects employees to the benefits, which creates true retention.

A nonqualified retention program, or sometimes called a SERP (supplemental employee retirement plan) offers the additional benefits of investment discretion, where employees may self-direct their unvested balances across a 401(k)-type menu of funds. SERPs also offer distribution and taxation discretion that allows employees to control the timing of the distribution of benefits. Employers can give employees the opportunity to re-defer their benefits, keeping them invested in a tax-deferred vehicle after they’ve vested. Additionally, a nonqualified program allows plan sponsors a great deal of flexibility when it comes to vesting schedules. Participants can customize schedules and contribution occurrences to fit the organization’s objectives.

  • Compensation philosophy and communication: Employees will develop their own opinions if you don’t communicate with them directly about pay. In a world where it’s easy for employees to gather salary information online, being clear and transparent about the compensation program, including how you review and determine pay rates and market competitiveness, can give your employees confidence that they will be treated fairly and equitably.

Learning, Growth and Development
The “Great Reshuffle” is leading employees to examine their purpose, work lives and future like never before. Learning and development are a key focus for some employees’ future growth and fulfillment. At the same time, companies are faced with the reality that a significant portions of their workforce may leave or retire in the next five to 10 years. Not surprisingly, according to LinkedIn’s Workplace Learning Report, the primary focus areas of learning and development programs in 2022 are:

  • Leadership and management training.
  • Upskilling and reskilling employees.
  • Digital upskilling and digital transformation.
  • Diversity, equity and inclusion.

With these core skills in mind, learning is becoming central to everyday work, and key to developing future talent. Employees who feel that their skills are not being put to good use in their current job are 10 times more likely to look for a new job than those who feel their skills are being put to good use, according to LinkedIn’s September 2021 survey.

Culture and Connection
Even the best total rewards package can’t make up for a toxic culture. It’s critical to focus on your people and provide opportunities to connect, collaborate and build relationships (whether in person or virtually). This will support your employee’s mental health while building connection with your organization, improving employee retention.

These three total rewards trends all share one thing: It’s important to have leadership and manager support to truly see success. Executives must also communicate early and often with employees in all of these areas, so they understand the true value of your bank’s offerings and have a positive and engaging employee experience. The right components of a total rewards package empowers banks to attract and retain high performing talent to drive performance to the next level.

Compensation Survey Results: An “Untenable” Talent Climate

Intensifying competition for talent is forcing banks to pay up for both new hires and existing employees.

There were two jobs for every job seeker as recently as March, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and employers of all stripes may be feeling like the balance of power has shifted. The results of Bank Director’s 2022 Compensation Survey, sponsored by Newcleus Compensation Advisors, show the banking industry is no exception to these dynamics.

Seventy-eight percent of responding directors, human resources officers, CEOs and other senior executives say that it was harder in 2021 to attract and keep the talent their bank needs than in past years. They’re responding to that challenge, in large part, by raising pay. Ninety-eight percent say their organization raised non-executive pay in 2021, and 85% increased executive compensation. Overall, compensation increased by a median 5%, according to participants.

That’s led bankers to shift their priorities. Managing compensation and benefits costs (46%), paying competitively (40%) and recruiting commercial lenders (34%) have emerged as respondents’ top compensation-related challenges this year. The proportion of respondents most concerned with tying compensation to performance — the top challenge identified in past surveys, going back to 2019 — fell sharply to 21% from 43% last year.

Even in the face of rising compensation costs, they’re also focusing on retaining and keeping staffing levels stable. Fully half of respondents say their bank added staff over the past year and 34% maintained staffing levels. Just 16% decreased their total number of employees. More than half (54%) of those whose bank decreased head count cite competition from other financial institutions and companies in their markets as the primary reason for the decline.

When asked about the specific challenges their organization faces in attracting and retaining talent, bankers and directors point to an insufficient number of qualified candidates (76%), rising wages in their markets (68%) and rising pay for key positions (43%). In anonymous comments, respondents describe other difficulties, such as competition from other industries, challenges with remote or hybrid work and younger workers’ disinclination for certain types of long-term compensation.

“[W]age pressure is incredible,” writes one community bank executive . “Our most significant competitor just implemented [four] weeks of vacation for ALL new hires and pays up to 25% higher for retail banking positions. That cost structure is untenable unless we earn more. We are under extreme pressure for talent at the same time we are building out revenue business lines.”

Key Findings

Banks Pay Up
Banks almost universally report increased pay for employees and executives. Of these, almost half believe that increased compensation expense has had an overall positive effect on their company’s profitability and performance. Forty-three percent say the impact has been neutral.

Lenders In Demand
Seventy-one percent expect to add commercial bankers in 2022, which is almost certainly driven by a desire to grow commercial portfolios and offset expense growth. Over half of respondents say their bank did not adjust its incentive plan for commercial lenders in 2022, but 34% have adjusted it in anticipation of more demand.

Additional Talent Needs
Banks also plan to add technology talent (39%), risk and compliance personnel (29%) and branch staff (25%) in 2022. Respondents also indicate that commercial lenders, branch and entry-level staff, and technology professionals were the most difficult positions to fill in 2020-21.

Image Enhancement
Forty percent of respondents say their organization monitors its reputation on job-posting platforms such as Indeed or Glassdoor. Further, 59% say they promote their company and brand across social media in an effort to build a reputation as an employer of choice, while just 20% use Glassdoor, Indeed or similar platforms in this manner.

CEO Turnover
Sixty-one percent of respondents indicate that they’re not worried about their CEO leaving for a competing financial institution, while a third report low to moderate levels of concern. More than half say their CEO is under the age of 60. Respondents report a median total compensation spend for the CEO at just over $600,000.

Remote Work Persists
Three quarters of respondents say they continue to offer remote work options for at least some of their staff, and the same percentage also believe that remote work options help to retain employees. Thirty-eight percent of respondents believe that remote work hasn’t changed their company’s culture, while 31% each say it has had either a positive or negative impact.

To view the high-level findings, click here.

Bank Services members can access a deeper exploration of the survey results. Members can click here to view the complete results, broken out by asset category and other relevant attributes. If you want to find out how your bank can gain access to this exclusive report, contact bankservices@bankdirector.com.