What Venture Capitalists Predict in the World of Fintech


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Fintech is no longer the enemy of banking. While much of the talk among fintech companies just a year or two ago was that they wanted to disrupt the dinosaurs of banking, now the tone has changed, said several speakers at the FinXTech Annual Summit Wednesday in New York City.

“I’ve seen a slight change in the business model, where it’s now about —How can we partner with the banks?’’’ said Jim Hale, the founding partner of FTV Capital, a venture capital firm. “The tone has changed.”

The event gathered more than 200 entrepreneurs and bankers together to discuss partnerships, financial technology and trends. Hale was one of several venture capitalists at the conference giving his perspective on future trends in financial technology and the challenges of partnering with banks.

In fact, many of the biggest banks, some of them in attendance, such as Wells Fargo & Co. and Citigroup, have started venture capital arms to invest in fintech startups, so they can learn and influence the direction of future technology.

The most active banks investing in fintech startups are Banco Santander, Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Mizuho Financial Group and JPMorgan Chase & Co., according to a new report from CBInsights, which tracks financial technology investments globally.

The report said global venture capital funding and deal activity fell slightly in the first quarter compared to a year ago, but rose compared to the fourth quarter of 2016, a trend that venture capitalist Ryan Gilbert, a partner at Propel Venture Partners, said was likely the result of uncertainty brought on by Brexit and the U.S. presidential election.

There were 226 venture-backed investments in financial technology companies globally in the first quarter of 2017, receiving $2.7 billion in funding, compared to 256 investments and $4.9 billion in the first quarter of 2016, according to CBInsights. In the U.S., there were 90 deals financed in the first quarter with $1.1 billion in cash, compared to 137 in the first quarter of last year at $1.8 billion.

Hale estimated that 90 percent of fintech companies focus directly on consumers, but he is more interested in funding solutions that solve the back-office problems and infrastructure needs of banks. He is also interested in solutions that manage data quicker, faster and cheaper than current solutions do.

Gregg Schoenberg, the founder of Westcott Capital, said he sees opportunity to make asset management more efficient, since the cost structure in these organizations is high. Banks also have a tremendous amount of data on their customers and could use that more effectively. Few other industries are required by law to collect as much data on their customers as banks are, which have to meet know-your-customer and anti-money laundering mandates, he said.

For examples of how technology can create more efficient processes, banks might look to successful companies such as Domino’s Pizza, which has a high stock price not based on the quality of its pizza, but by its distribution system, Schoenberg said. The company has a robotics division and 17 different ways to order a pizza, he added.

Gilbert is looking to invest in emerging technologies such as voice recognition and artificial intelligence, enabling capabilities like having conversations anytime with your “banker” in the form of a chat bot, for example.

“That’s really rethink and rebuild,” he said. Gilbert is often more excited about innovation happening outside the U.S., such as Singapore, a country with a lot of wealth and a stable, central regulator, and where banks are using chat bots and voice recognition software.

In the U.S., there are more hurdles, and multiple regulatory bodies for the banking industry, including federal and state agencies. Just yesterday, the Conference of State Bank Supervisors sued the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency over the latter’s proposal to regulate fintech firms.

Still, Gilbert is not pessimistic. “Now is not the time to give up,’’ he said in an interview yesterday. “We have 5,800 banks and there are a lot of opportunities to turn these institutions into great things. Technology is developing at such a rapid pace. The best is yet to come.”

Recognizing How Fintech Companies Are Making Banks Better


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While the financial technology sector is still viewed as a source of competition, most fintech companies focus on providing solutions that will ultimately make banks more efficient and profitable. True, some fintech firms do compete head-to-head with banks, but the great majority of them are more interested in partnering with banks in ways that will benefit both sides. In recognition of this growing trend towards cooperation, FinXTech.com recently held its 2nd annual Best of FinXTech Awards, which highlights collaborative efforts between banks and fintech companies working together in a successful partnership. From a pool of 10 finalists, three winners were chosen by this year’s FinXTech Advisory Group. The judging criteria were strength of integration, innovation and growth in revenue, reputation and the customer base that resulted form the project. The three teams, whose stories are detailed below, were honored today at the FinXTech Summit in New York.

USAA and Nuance

Headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, USAA wanted to develop a stronger relationship with current customers while also attracting new customers through the use of technology that would meet their needs and preferences. Since 2013, USAA has utilized Burlington, Massachusetts-based Nuance’s virtual assistant technology—called Nina—on its mobile banking app. Nina leverages natural language understanding and artificial intelligence to provide a proactive and personalized customer experience. In 2016, following Nina’s widespread adoption by USAA members on the mobile channel, the bank deployed Nina on its usaa.com website.

On usaa.com, Nina provides immediate, human-like support and assists USAA members with tasks such as activating cards, changing a PIN, adding travel notifications and reporting lost or stolen cards. Nina goes far beyond a static question-and-answer capability to deliver a more human experience that speaks, listens, understands and helps USAA members get things done efficiently. Nina responds to 1.4 million requests per month and eliminates the need for USAA members to sift through menus, ensuring that every interaction begins and ends with an effortless, natural experience. Through its partnership with Nuance, USAA is able to provide its customers with a compelling, multi-channel, automated customer service experience that keeps it ahead of the pack.

Scotiabank and Sensibill

In October 2016, Scotiabank—Canada’s third largest bank—and Sensibill, both of Toronto, launched eReceipts, a service that allows customers to store, organize and retrieve any receipt (paper or electronic) directly from Scotiabank’s mobile banking app and wallet. Scotiabank is the first of the Canadian Tier 1 banks to rollout the solution, and Scotiabank CEO Brian Porter has referred to it as a “game-changing application.”

Sensibill’s receipt processing engines uses deep learning and machine-learning to extract and structure information about each item, including product names and SKU codes. This adds clarity to otherwise vague transactions and reduces the friction associated with searching for a specific purchase. The service is also the first to offer consumers automatic matching of receipts to card transaction histories, which supports customers’ need for convenience and accessibility and enables Scotiabank to provide a seamless end-to-end payment experience.

Scotiabank customers use the service to track both personal and business expenses, with approximately 38 interactions with the service per month per customer. In the same way that online and mobile bill pay serves as a “sticky” product that retains customers who do not want to move their information to another bank, eReceipts has the propensity to reduce attrition. Forty-eight percent of eReceipts users use the app’s folders and notes to keep themselves organized, with captured receipts often being revisited. Not only does the app improve the customer experience, it also has the potential to lower the bank’s costs. For example, Scotiabank believes that 20 percent of credit and debit card queries could have been resolved through the Sensibill app, which ultimately should lead to a reduction in call center activity.

Green Dot Corp. and Uber Technologies Inc.

One of the biggest challenges workers in the gig economy face is gaining speedy access to their earnings. In March 2016, Uber, the transportation network company headquartered in San Francisco, and Green Dot, a prepaid card issuer located in Pasadena, California, launched a customized business version of Green Dot’s GoBank mobile checking account. Initially piloted in San Francisco and a few other cities, the solution provides Uber drivers with immediate access to their funds through a feature called Instant Pay. All drivers do is open a free Uber debit card from a mobile GoBank checking account and use this account to access their earnings instantly, for free, up to five times per day. Drivers are also able to use their Uber debit card for free at any of GoBank’s 42,000 ATMs spread across the country, and can also use it for transactions wherever Visa cards are accepted.

The pilot was so successful that in June 2016, Uber offered the solution to all of its drivers nationally, resulting in over 100,000 drivers signing up since August. That same month, in response to driver feedback and increasing demand, Uber and Green Dot announced it was expanding Instant Pay to work with not only a GoBank account, but almost any U.S. MasterCard, Visa or Discover debit card that is attached to a traditional checking and savings account. The expanded debit card program has scaled quickly, with millions of transactions having occurred between the August launch date and September 30, 2016.

The other seven finalists in this year’s Best of FinXTech Awards were IDFC Bank and TATA Consultancy Services, Franklin Synergy Bank and Built Technologies, National Bank of Kansas City and Roostify, Somerset Trust Co. and BOLTS Technologies, Toronto-Dominion Bank and Moven, Woodforest National Bank and PrecisionLender, and WSFS Bank and LendKey.

Innovation: The Time Is Now


Technological transformation can be a key solution as banks seek efficiency and address changing consumer expectations. In this video, Manoj Daga of Sutherland Global Services outlines how banks should focus their efforts to innovate.

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  • Potential for Automation
  • Where Banks Should Invest