Want to Go Fast, Go Alone. Want to Go Far, Go Together.

January 11th, 2017

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There was a plaque in my father’s office that is attributed to the late David Ogilvy, often called “The Father of Advertising. It read, “Search the parks in all your cities, you’ll find no statues of committees,” which I always interpreted to mean, “YOU need to make something happen; don’t wait on others to get going.”

But going it alone in the banking industry is extremely difficult because of the complexities around regulation, underwriting, competition and the thousands of vendors that serve it. Combine that with record breaking investment in financial technology and the next few years may very well serve as our “big bang” and usher in a new era of banking.

I’ve observed how companies seeking to make a real impact within the industry rarely do it alone. While we need committees in business, maybe what we need more is a “virtual committee,” or community of fintech players, to better understand the nuances within the landscape. The value of this fintech community is to provide industry intelligence, serve as a sounding-board for new ideas and foster relationships to move you faster in achieving your organizational goals.

The fintech community should also include thought leaders, published research and reports—and most importantly, peers from outside your organization. Even competitors can be valuable resources for your company and contribute to your personal development.

The banking segment will likely see more action than the rest of the economy. In the future we will probably witness the following:

  • The adoption of a new fintech charter
  • A relaxation of the regulatory burden
  • Improved bank earnings, helped in part by rising interest rates
  • Increased customer expectations

Individuals and organizations that embrace the industry as a community and foster relationships will have a competitive advantage.

Why Dramatic Change in Banking is Hard
Many of the products and services that banks offer are mature, even bordering on commodity status. Technology advances we see in our industry tend to fall into a few categories:

  • How banks deliver products (channel)
  • Customer insights and recommendations (managing their money better)
  • Ease of doing business (speed, simplicity and service)
  • Tweaks to traditional business models (sources of funding, hyper-focused segmentation)
  • Operational improvements (automated processes, enhanced security and improved regulatory compliance processes, to name three)

Many of the platforms we used today are in the process of being either rewritten or replaced. According to one vendor, the life cycle of fintech moving forward will be five years or less on average.

The technology that the vast majority of financial institutions use today is a result of decisions spanning over many years and engagements with a lot of vendors—typically from dozens to hundreds of relationships.

Media, fintech executives and investors have a tendency to focus on new and shiny technology without an appreciation of how hard it is to run a technology company in the financial industry, much less what it takes to achieve long-term success.

Agents For Change
Vendors looking to grow their businesses seek focused education and networking opportunities. Organizations such as the Association for Financial Technology, or AFT, enable vendors to learn about technologies, which organizations are doing well, and gain industry insights that help provide a perspective for decision-making. This particular fintech community includes companies of all sizes that have implementations in virtually every U.S. financial institution.

Ultimately, people do business with people, and fintech advances won’t happen until two people or two companies agree on a shared vision. Finding your community, and being a good citizen within it, will enable you to grow professionally and help your company succeed and make a positive impact.

Additional resource: “What You Need to Know About AFT Fall Summit 2016” by Kelly Williams.

ScottMills

Scott Mills is president of William Mills Agency.