Understanding Your Bank’s Capital Alternatives

October 18th, 2017

capital-10-18-17.pngIt is crucial for executive management to engage their boards in practical conversations surrounding the raising of capital. Important questions include what form of capital is best from a strategic perspective, how much dilution to earnings per share (EPS) is acceptable and how soon can the dilution be earned back. To answer these questions, management must first have a solid understanding of each type of capital.

Common Equity
Common equity tends to receive the most favorable treatment from a regulatory perspective and is fully included in Tier 1 capital. This, however, comes at a cost beyond the 5 to 7 percent fee paid to your investment banker. A common equity raise increases the number of shares outstanding. This translates to dilution of earnings per share and existing ownership until the new capital is leveraged, or put to work.

When a bank undergoes a common equity raise, it also gives up ownership and voting rights. If the bank is unable to raise common equity at or above current tangible book value per share (TBVS), or is concerned with existing ownership dilution, it should seriously consider an alternative source of capital. Banks must have clearly defined parameters in place for raising capital, particularly its impact on TBVS and EPS.

When evaluating a common offering, two key considerations are: (1) whether to conduct a private offering or undergo an IPO, and (2) whether to raise capital internally or externally. Having a strategic plan in place is critical to ensure that the bank can execute on deploying capital and earning back the initial shareholder dilution.

IPO or No?
Not everyone needs to conduct an initial public offering (IPO), but for larger institutions or institutions seeking liquidity, it is an excellent option. An IPO provides liquidity for stockholders, generates capital to accelerate growth, and depending on trading volume establishes currency that can be utilized in acquisitions. Once an institution undergoes an IPO it has also created access to capital markets for follow-on offerings to continue to raise capital as needed. While IPOs provide a faster vehicle to raise capital, they also require more time from key management, detracting from their role in day-to-day operations.

Subchapter-S corporations must consider ramifications of increasing their shareholder base before triggering a requirement to convert to a stock corporation. Once an S-corporation exceeds 100 stockholders, it must convert to a C-corporation, which has immediate tax implications and changes in reporting requirements.

Private Placements
For smaller banks or institutions that are closely held, private placements may be preferable to an IPO. Although the timeframe for a private placement may be longer, less time is required from management. Private placements are limited to existing stockholders, accredited investors and qualified institutional buyers. While private placements are generally smaller and less dilutive to EPS, it can also may be difficult to raise larger amounts of capital using this vehicle. The bank will be able to remain private with less pressure to immediately leverage capital, allowing greater autonomy in strategic decisions.

Alternative Sources of Capital
Noncumulative perpetual preferred stock can be counted towards Tier 1 capital and can be used to increase tangible equity. Banks with a clean risk profile may be willing to operate with lower levels of tangible common equity and focus on bolstering tangible equity. Preferred stock is generally less expensive to raise, although there is a post-tax dividend that can range from 5 to 9 percent.

For banks with a holding company, another form of capital—debt—can be down-streamed in its entirety to common equity at the bank level. Debt is the least expensive form of capital, costing approximately 3 percent to raise with no dividends and tax-exempt interest expense.

Regardless of the approach used to raise capital, be realistic in how much you can effectively leverage. Excess capital may be viewed favorably from a regulatory perspective but can become a value detractor if not effectively deployed. This is particularly true for banks entertaining the possibility of a sale. Over-capitalized targets are likely to be priced on a leveraged capital approach, meaning that tangible common equity in excess of a certain percentage of average assets will be priced at 100 percent TBVS and only the leveraged portion of capital will receive a premium.

When raising capital in any form, proactively communicate with regulators and stockholders remembering that neither party likes surprises. Work with your financial advisor to run pro forma analyses on multiple scenarios and establish parameters for EPS and ownership dilution to maximize the impact of your capital raise.

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Britt Nosher is a senior financial analyst at FinPro Capital Advisors (FCA). For more information, contact Britt at (908)-234-9398 or bnosher@finprocapitaladvisors.com.

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Don Musso is the president of FinPro Capital Advisors, Inc. Mr. Musso founded FinPro, Inc. in 1987, and the company is a nationally known thought leader in community banking. In 2012, Mr. Musso formed FinPro Capital Advisors, Inc. (FCA) as a wholly owned subsidiary of FinPro to conduct capital market and investment banking activities.