Five Critical Mistakes to Avoid in Any Headquarters Project

May 15th, 2019

headquarters-5-15-19.pngCorporate headquarter projects are likely one of the biggest investments a bank will make in itself.

With a lot of time and money on the line, it is no surprise that these massive projects quickly become an area of major stress for executives. Most management teams have limited experience in executing projects of this kind. The stakes are high. Bad workplace design costs U.S. businesses at least $330 billion annually in lost efficiency, productivity and overall employee engagement, according to Facility Executive.

A lot can go wrong when planning a corporate headquarters. Executives should use a data-based approach and address these issues in order to avoid five critical oversights:

1. Overpromising and Under-delivering to the Board
You should feel confident that every decision for your planned headquarters is the right one. The last thing you want to do after you get the board’s approval on the size, budget and completion date for the project is go back for more money and time because of educated guesses or bad estimates.

Avoiding this comes down to how you approach the project. Select a design-build firm that considers your needs and asks about historical and projected growth, trends and amenities, among other issues. This will help mitigate risk and create a plan, budget and timeline based on research and deliberation

2. Miscommunication Between Design and Construction
Partnering with a design-build firm helps alleviate the potential for miscommunication and costly changes between architects and construction crews. Look for firms with a full understanding of costs, locally available resources and current rates, so they can design with a budget in mind. Some firms offer a guaranteed maximum price on a project that can eliminate surprises. 

3. Missing the Mark on Efficiencies and Adjacencies
The way employees work individually and collaborate with others is changing. Growing demand for work areas like increased “focus spaces,” more intimate conference rooms and other amenities should not to be ignored. Forgetting to consider which departments should be next to each other to foster efficiency is also an oversight that could dampen your bank’s overall return. Look for a firm that has an understanding of banking and how adjacencies can play a role in efficiency that can guide you toward which trends are right for your bank.

4. Outgrowing the New Space too Soon
I have witnessed a project that was not properly planned, and the board was asked to fund another project for a new, larger building only five years after the first one. As you can probably imagine, the next project is being watched and scrutinized at every turn.

Most architectural designers will ask you what you want and may look at whatever historical data you provide. Beyond that, how will you know if the building will last? A good design-build firm should incorporate trends from the financial industry into your design; a great one will provide you with data, projected growth patterns and research, so you can demonstrate to the board that the bank is making the right investment and that the new space will last.

5. Forgetting the People Piece
Not communicating with your employees or leadership on the reasons behind the change or how to use the new space often means leaving money and happiness on the table. The design and the features of the building frame the company culture, but the people complete the picture.

Make sure to show your workforce the purpose of the new space. Help get everyone excited and on the same page with the use, process and procedures. Do not drop the ball after the hard work of building the headquarters.

When it comes to any project—especially one of this size and magnitude—always measure twice and cut once.

jwsmith

John W. Smith is the CEO of DBSI and CFM. DBSI and CFM deliver one of the most comprehensive set of services to assist the banking industry transform through effective strategy, design, build, technology and software.