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Committees : Lending

Twist This

October 3rd, 2011 |

america-money.jpgYour country needs you. Your country needs you to go into debt, that is.

Hoping to jumpstart a lackluster lending environment, the Federal Reserve recently announced “Operation Twist” to drive down long-term interest rates such as the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage while increasing short-term interest rates.

The idea, a much bigger replay of a 50-year economic program of the Federal Reserve during the Kennedy administration, is that the move will make long-term borrowing more attractive, which could encourage home buyers to buy homes and businesses to invest in job creation.  But will it?

Scott Brown, the chief economist and senior vice president for Raymond James & Associates, says the Federal Reserve’s $400 billion program of buying and selling U.S. Treasury securities is trying to get banks to lend more, possibly by squeezing the interest margins that banks depend on. This interest margin is the difference between the interest banks charge on loans and the interest they pay out for deposits. As their profits get squeezed, the banks could increase lending to make more money.

But will they?

“With banks in a much better position than they were three years ago, the Fed is betting that a flatter curve, and margin compression, will not cause undo strain, but instead lead them to make up the difference in loan volumes,’’ Brown writes in his weekly commentary. “We’ll see.”

The problem with such an approach is that there are few high-quality borrowers out there wanting to get loans, and the banks have worked hard to improve the credit quality of the assets on their books. The idea that they would stretch their underwriting guidelines to offer more loans is doubtful, and whether their regulators would even allow it is also doubtful.

What could really spur lending is for more high-quality borrowers to somehow come out of the woodwork looking for loans at record low interest rates. But many potential homebuyers can’t sell the homes they do have or take advantage of low rates to refinance as home values continue to decline. Freddie Mac announced this week that the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell to a record low of 4.01 percent as of Sept. 29.

In contrast, the short-term, five-year adjustable -rate mortgage rate ticked up after the Sept. 21 announcement by the Federal Reserve from 2.99 percent to 3.01 percent. It has remained flat since then, according to Freddie Mac.

Whether all this will spur lending is another matter.

“We question whether this program can be successful because we believe the lack of borrowing and lending activity has more to do with other fundamental economic and regulatory conditions than it does with interest rates,’’ writes G. David MacEwen, chief investment officer of fixed income for American Century Investments.

He goes on to describe the Federal Reserve’s toolbox as “nearly empty.”

It may be that the Federal Reserve is in the same boat as the Obama administration: there’s not that much more it can do to incentivize a reluctant and hobbled private sector. The government would like you to borrow, but will you?

 

nsnyder

Naomi Snyder is the managing editor for Bank Director, an information resource for directors and officers of financial companies. You can follow her on Twitter at twitter.com/naomisnyder or get connected on LinkedIn.

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